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X-53 Touuring Rocker Mounts November 15, 2010

Posted by Wilhelm Arcturus in entertainment, World of Warcraft.
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It is like the WoW account phishers aren’t even trying any more.

What with Cataclysm coming up shortly, the WoW account scammers are losing the biggest gun in their arsenal of late, the bogus invite to the Cataclysm beta.

Now they appear to be casting about for some new hook with which to lure people.

And so it was that I got this phishing attempt:

Subject: X-53 Touuring Rocker Mounts

Greetings

Blizzard Entertainment to celebrate the 5th anniversary, special thanks to the old players, if you invite your friends participate in World of Warcraft before, you can get: Human Warrior: Archilon Shadowheart Action Figure or World of Warcraft  Pet: Pandaren Monk.you are drawn in the system to receive your gift.

Pleast visit: [completely bogus, not even trying to hide it URL] X-53 Touuring Rocker Mounts.

We look forward to working with you in the World of Warcraft: Blizzard Entertainment to celebrate the 5th anniversary.

You may safely disregard any warning messages that appear to alert you that the beta opt-in application is unsigned. For more information, refer to the Blizzard Support website

Regards,
Beta Account Support

Blizzard Entertainment
BLIZZARD (noreply@blizzard.com)

This isn’t a phishing attempt.  This is some sort of calculated insult to my intelligence.

I want to track this person down not to bring him to justice but just to say, “Dude, WTF?  Is that the best you could do?  Or were you just trying to piss me off?”

I mean, Touuring Rocker Mounts?  Are we talking about concert groupies here or what?

And the World of Warcraft 5th anniversary?  That was, you know, A YEAR AGO!

Then the email switches over to talking about a beta opt-in application.  What? What does that have to do with groupies or WoW’s 5th year anniversary?

But I am assured that whatever this opt-in is, I can safely disregard any warnings about missing or unverified digital certificates.   Or at least I think that is what the message means.

And the salutation is from Beta Account Support.

Finally, the email address “noreply@blizzard.com” is helpfully added to the end of the message.

Really?  You call this social engineering?  This is your best shot?

Comments»

1. ScytheNoire - November 15, 2010

I sometimes go through and look at the one’s I get in my gmail spam folder, because they can be very amusing. They really are horrible done and I question if someone who falls for them should even be allowed on the internet.

2. scotth - November 15, 2010

I have been seeing people selling rocket mounts in trade chat in game. I assume that is a scam as well, or would at least require violateing the TOS somehow.

3. Aufero - November 15, 2010

The thing that amuses me about spam like this is how low the bar for passing a Turing test has fallen.

4. Wilhelm2451 - November 15, 2010

Heh, I was going to try to make a Turing test joke out of this, given the title “Touuring/Turing,” but decided that the true comedy was in the the email itself.

5. Piacenza - November 17, 2010

Today I got a phishing email that I’ve never received before.

“Hello,

Blizzard Entertainment recently received a request to change the e-mail address used to log in to the Battle.net account with the username (my email address). The e-mail address k***@hotmail.com has been specified as the new username for this Battle.net account. An email has been sent to this new address containing a verification link to complete the change.

Once the new address has been verified, the e-mail address (my email address) can no longer be used to log in to this Battle.net account or any World of Warcraft accounts merged with this Battle.net account.

If you did not initiate this request, please click here to contact the Blizzard Billing & Account Services team immediately.

Sincerely,
The Battle.net Account Team”

Hmmm. No one accusing me of trying to sell my character, offering me a beta key or a mount or anything. I even copied what was behind the links into Word, and it looked like it could be authentic.

I knew it had to be bogus, though, because I have an authenticator, and you can’t even log into the website without it – but the “k***@hotmail.com” made my blood run cold, so I actually spent half a hour on hold with Blizzard just to be *sure*.

Silly rabbit.

6. Dave - November 18, 2010

I feel pretty safe with the authenticator. However I have it on my phone. I just can’t bring myself to carry around the keychain version. I did have to wipe my iPhone (which locked me out) and then spent a few days trying to get Blizz Acct support to take it off.

7. peter - November 22, 2010

It’s the Tauren Chieftain Groupies! That totally makes sense!

8. Tesh - November 22, 2010

@Piacenza
I’ve received a handful of “changed password” phishing emails to an email address I use for a lot of things, but as far as Blizzard knows, I’ve only ever used it for ten day WoW trials.

I really do wonder if the phishers are just carpet bombing hotmail accounts, trying out all possible names.


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