Daily Archives: May 30, 2012

NBI – Spurious Blogging Tips and Lies My Parents Told Me

The New Blogger Initiate appears to be over already.  I thought the last post was supposed to be on the end of the month.  And yet I still have bad advice to spread about.  Enough procrastination.

I generally have one good suggestion for bloggers, after which my advice tends to fall into two categories.

The first is advice that is so specific to my own situation that it probably won’t be all that helpful, while the rest is so general that it will likewise not be all that helpful.

So, first, my one good piece of advice… and even that is just my opinion.

Be The Blog You Want to Read

Even that seems to be sort of a “duh” statement.

But seriously, I presume that you have decided to jump into MMO blogging after having read some other MMO blogs.  And those blogs have probably made an impression on you.  And I bet some of those sites had aspects you did not like.  Don’t do those things.  Your blog should be the example you want others to follow.

Other than that, I have a few items which work for me.

Organize

You want to know Tobold’s biggest blogging crime is in my opinion?  You cannot find shit on his blog once it falls off the front page.

Effective use of tags, categories, and timelines can make it much easier to find your past efforts on a given subject.  Unless, of course, you don’t want people to find what you have said in the past.

For the most part people won’t go looking for things.  Most people will rarely look at anything except your last couple of posts.  But if you are like me, YOU will probably want to find things you have posted in the past, and organization helps.

Have a Philosophy

I feel that failing on this front is what leads most bloggers to give up after a short time.

If the answer to the question, “Why do you have a blog?” is “Because I want a blog!” then you might not be ready to begin.  I know I wasn’t.  I started off with wanting to write a blog about online gaming and was all over the map for a while.

Then I settled down a bit when I finally realized what I wanted the blog to be.  My blogging philosophy is to weave together my own gaming experiences… tales of the weekly instance group, exploits in EVE Online, and so forth… with a timeline of major events in the industry like MMO launches, closings, expansions, and that sort of headline and press release sort of thing.  I also add in a bit about the actual act of blogging and that is the general mix that makes up TAGN.

And yet I do not feel bound by my philosophy.  I set aside the weekend for the occasional post on other topics.

Add Value

This is tough, because value can be very subjective.  For example, I do not post press releases without comment.  But my comments are rarely very insightful.  They tend to sum up the impact on me.  That is value to me, but it may not be so for you.  And if you have decided to create a MMO press release blog, you can make the argument that a single source of such press releases, especially if well organized, adds value by its existence.  But you ought to feel that there is some value to your posts.  That may help sustain you when the initial warm glow of a new blog starts to fade.

Give Yourself Some Structure

I have one regular weekly post about the instance group’s activities over the past weekend, which runs on Thursday for reasons of laziness.  And then I post a once a month summary for reasons I can no longer recall, other than it seemed like a good idea at the time.  Those two recurring posts are the structure of the blog, and everything else is extra.

Link Like You are Getting Paid to Link

When in doubt, link to something.  Link to source material.  Link to press releases.  Link to other blog posts on the subject.  Link to your past posts on the subject.  Link to definitions of big words.  This is the internet, and the biggest advantage it gives you is the ability to quickly and easily connect to other material on the same subject.  While I link out a lot, I still feel I could be doing more.  Plus, you know, link whoring.

Do Not Depend Too Much on Links

The flip side of the above is link rot.  While it is a great thing to be able to link to all sorts of supporting material, do not depend on it to carry the weight of your post.  I groan when I see a post that contains a “go read this” link and then offers an opinion that depends on the context of off-site material to carry the post.  Because that link is going to go dead some day, and then that post will make no sense.  I try to keep quotes and context on my own site and link back to their source… like I was writing a real paper or something.  Sometimes I get lazy and don’t, and then a link goes dead and I kick myself for it.

Do Not Take Things Too Seriously

Yourself included, unless you plan to make this your profession.  It is only a blog.  Blogs are a dime a dozen, and for each one that is against some aspect of online games, you can find another that is completely in favor of it.   So if you reach a point where you find yourself taking game companies to task because they do not listen to your advice… and you are not actually in the industry but just some person on the internet… you’ve probably gone too far.

Headlines Can Be a Lot of Fun

Even now, somebody is probably trying to figure out what lies my parents told me.  Other than the usual ones… Santa, the Easter Bunny, the impact of swallowing watermelon seeds, and the existence of El Segundo…  I cannot recall any huge, earth shattering lies.  But they might still be holding out on me.

Hulkageddon V – Destruction Comes to an End… Mostly…

Hulkageddon V is now over.  The last API verified kill has been counted.  The event, having run from April 29th through May 29th, is now over.

(That is EVE Online game time, which runs on UTC.)

Hulkageddon V – The oft used picture

It was both the longest and most destructive iteration of the event, running for a full month and leaving almost 7,600 wrecked mining vessels in its wake worth a (low) estimated 1.47 trillion ISK.  That is the API verified number from the leaderboard.

 

Champion kills are exhumers and Orcas, while Junior kills are tier 1 mining barges.

EVE-Kill.net shows more than 8,600 kills.

But that includes manually entered kills, and with Goonswarm offering a bounty of 100 million ISK for every 10 exhumer kills, you have to figure some of that is bogus.  Who could resist trying to scam the Goons after all.

I will stick with the lower number for the purpose of comparing past events.

And here is the comparison.  This is how past events have totaled up.

  • Hulkageddon IV ran for just 9 days and say a little over 1,400 mining ships destroyed, putting the rate of destruction at about 155 a day.
  • Hulkageddon III posted over 2,400 mining ship kills over its 9 day run, putting the kill rate at about 267 vessels a day.
  • Hulkageddon II ran for just 7 days, but saw a kill rate of 214 per day, with over 1,500 mining ships destroyed during its run.
  • And the first Hulkageddon was a very modest, 2 day affair, with just 88 exhumers and mining barges meeting their end.

So Hulkageddon V lead to the destruction of more mining ships than all past iterations of the even combined.  Of course, it also ran more than three times as long as past events; more days means more kills.  So when averaged out, Hulkageddon V appears to be shy of the rate of kills set by Hulkageddon III, with a rate of about 244 kills per day. (Or 278 kills per day if you take the eve-kill.net number for true.)

I suspect that the rate of kills per day would have been higher had the event been shorter.  Things got off to a very fast start and was close to the 4,000 kill mark only 11 days into the event.  If it had kept up that pace we would be talking bigger numbers.

Of course, even after the event is over, the anger from some rages on. (hat tip to Jester on that one)

And, to a certain extent, the event itself continues to rage on with an announcement from The Mittani that Goonswarm payouts for exhumer kills will continue until further notice.  This announcement even has its own official thread in the EVE forums now.

Another fine OTEC moment.  Every Hulk destroyed is more technetium sold for its replacement.  We shall see if this keeps high sec mining suppressed.