Tag Archives: Mists of Pandaria

WoW Legion Sales Numbers Stacked Up Against Past Launches

Today, Blizzard announced that players have forged a truly formidable defensive front—as of the expansion’s first full day of launch on August 30, more than 3.3 million copies of Legion had sold through, matching the all-time record achieved by previous expansions and making it one of the fastest-selling PC games ever. In addition, World of Warcraft’s launch-week player concurrency climbed to its highest point since the 2010 launch of the Cataclysm expansion…

Blizzard press release, September 8, 2016

WoW Legion launched, which almost requires that there be some celebratory press release in which Blizzard referred to itself in the third person.

WoW Legion coming to a server near you

WoW Legion has been up for a week now

My guess is that they had that press release ready to go for a bit now, as they didn’t even bother to fill in the date before they posted it.  I imagine they will fix that before the day is out, so here it is a screen shot for the record.

Roman numerals maybe?

Roman numerals maybe?

So we got some numbers.  Blizzard kept to its promise not to mention subscription numbers ever again, so they had to make due with vague claims about concurrency. (No numbers = vague in my book)

The number we did get was 3.3 million copies sold in the first 24 hours. (Yes, they said “more than 3.3 million” in the press release, but if it had been 3.4 million they would have run with that number, so it is likely 3.3 million and change.)  As usual, with any number standing alone, I start looking for context.  Fortunately, the internet provides context if you look for it.  The first day sales track record looks like this:

  • WoW Legion – 3.3 million
  • Warlords of Draenor – 3.3 million
  • Mists of Pandaria – 2.7 million (first week)
  • Cataclysm – 3.3 million
  • Wrath of the Lich King – 2.8 million
  • Burning Crusade – 2.4 million
  • World of Warcraft – 240,000

So, for first day sales, WoW Legion ranks with… I don’t want to say “the best,” since its peers at that level are not my favorite expansions… past top sellers.

Warlords of Draenor did just as well according to the Blizzard press release from its launch, which included a mention of exceeding 10 million subscribers, a mark that would soon drop precipitously.

Mists of Pandaria, which in hindsight was a pretty good expansion, maybe my second favorite, and which held on to the player base admirably compare to WoD, had to go a full week to get to 2.7 million sales, which put it below every expansion save Burning Crusade.  The pleading for a new expansion towards the end of Mists of Pandaria now seem almost quaint given the mass exodus from the game that came with WoD.

Then there was Cataclysm, which I am going to say was probably the first point when digital sales made up a significant portion of the first day sales, setting a record as yet unbeaten, with 3.3 million sales.  There were some good things in that expansion, but the destruction of the old world still stings.

Then Wrath of the Lich King and Burning Crusade check in at 2.8 and 2.4 million units sold on the first day.  That was back when Fry’s was open at midnight to sell you a copy and they had pallets of boxes out on the sales floor.  That was the era of growth, which Cataclysm put paid to.

And finally, just for completeness, there was World of Warcraft back in 2004, which sold 240,000 copies on the first day, which was a record at the time.  No digital sales in that number I bet!

So that is how the list stacks up.  WoW Legion sold well enough, though judging from what I have seen… or not seen… on store shelves, it was almost all digital. (I was at Best Buy on Monday and they had a single standard edition, wrapped up protectively in an anti-theft device and sitting alone at the bottom of a shelf.  No display.  No signs.  No big deal.  How times have changed.) That likely means WoW Legion sold directly into the currently subscribed base in the US/EU.

It would be interesting to know what the subscriber base jumped up to with the launch.  I suspect that if it had passed 10 million, Blizz might have mentioned it.  But maybe not, and we’ll likely never see a number to prove it either way.

I will have to hang on to the two WoW Legion boxes we got at our house.

Retail Boxes! Old School!

Retail Boxes! Old School!

Given the state of the retail channel for the expansion, those might be collectible in a few years.  I mean, a DVD for WoW Legion?  I am not sure why they even bother.  The patcher had everything in place already.  All I needed was the code off the label and I was upgraded and playing.  Modern times.

The Last Good Day

There’s no way of knowing that your last good day is “Your Last Good Day.”  At the time, it is just another good day.

-Hazel Grace Lancaster, The Fault in Our Stars

Yes, I am going to take a quote from a movie based on a book about teens with cancer and try and apply it to video games.  I will take it as read that this makes me a horrible person and probably guilty of cultural appropriation or some other first world thought crime.  I even have a graphic just to seal the deal on my horrible nature.

Serious business...

Serious business…

Anyway, my daughter, who had read the book, insisted that the whole family go see the movie back when it was in the theater despite the fact that she knows that my wife will cry at anything sad or emotional on screen.  And tears were indeed shed as this sad and emotionally manipulative film ran on before us.

But what stuck with me, aside from the abuse of the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam and how much seeing this movie made watching Divergent difficult/amusing/distracting (Augustus is her brother! It is Luke and Leia all over again!), was the whole concept of there being a “last good day,” a high point in any endeavor, after which things are never quite that good again.

So, yeah, of course this applies to video games.

Well, at least to MMORPGs.  So maybe I can change that graphic.

A more general statement

A more general statement

I suppose I could make it more specific, or a version for each MMO I might play, but I think that is sufficient.  If you are dying to have one of your own, I made a background template, you just have to provide the text.  You’re on your own for the font.  I used one called “eraser dust” I found on the internet.

Anyway, that is all off the subject at hand, which is that of a last good day in an MMORPG.

There are MMOs where I can identify that last good day.  In Warhammer Online it was probably that one great keep battle we had before things went south for our group as the game emptied out.

In Rift it was no doubt some date not too long before the first expansion came out.  Everything was good, I played a character from each of the four base roles up to level cap, and then Storm Legion hit and changed the nature of the game for me.

For EverQuest it was likely to initial stages of the Fippy Darkpaw server, when Skronk and I were playing, the game was active with lots of low level players, and the whole thing felt… if not as good as day one back in 1999, then a reasonable facsimile of that time.  Certainly there was less crashing.

But those are all games I stopped playing.  Even EverQuest, for which I bubble with nostalgia, hasn’t really been a destination for me since Fippy Darkpaw.

And, in having stopped, I can pick out the high point.  I can find that theoretical last good day… or week… or era… or event.  But that might change if I would… or, in some cases, could… go back and pick up the game again.  Probably not, but there is a non-zero chance of good days ahead.

This all came to mind because of a more current game.  Not EVE Online.  I made that graphic at the top for Rixx Javix a while back.  No, this all came about due to the the Legion expansion for World of Warcraft getting a ship date.

WoW Legion coming to a server near you

Just in case your forgot that since yesterday

August 30, 2016 and the whole thing goes live, while at some date a couple weeks in advance of that there will be the pre-expansion patch that will have the warm-ups for the whole thing.

I am coming up on a year of not having been subscribed to WoW.  I have a two copies of the expansion pre-ordered for my daughter and I via Amazon.  But now that there is a date set and a timeline out before me.  I won’t be resubscribing today or tomorrow or next week, but at some point over the course of that timeline, between now and August 30th, there is a date at which I probably should subscribe and get back in the game and start getting warmed up to fight the Legion.

But the announcement of the date also made me question whether or not I really want to go back.  I do not feel a lot of enthusiasm for the expansion.  In large part that lack of enthusiasm is due to how Warlords of Draenor played out for me.  It wasn’t horrible, but it was dissatisfying, and garrisons carry the lions share of the burden on that front.  Dungeons were mediocre, mostly in how sparse they were, and the story line was mostly just okay, but garrisons were the anchor.

Garrisons failed to be the right thing for me on all fronts.  They were not optional, you had to do some garrison stuff if you wanted to play through the expansion.  And they were not housing, or at least did not have any aspect of housing that I wanted.  There was no way you could make the garrison really your own.  Meanwhile, they did exactly what Tom Chilton told us housing would do, back when he was saying they would never do housing, it took people out of the world and hid them away.

In my view, garrisons were basically the worst possible set of features, doing what Blizz said housing would do without any of the beneficial “sticky” features of housing that make people feel like they have a spot in the game that is uniquely their own.  I guess if I were to make a prediction now that Tom Chilton is saying that Blizz will never do a vanilla server, I might guess that they will end up doing some sort of special rules server that will satisfy neither fans of vanilla nor more recent lapsed players, at which point Tom can say, “I told you so.”

That is all my view of the expansion.  So when I think back in search of a “last good day,” which at this point I am likely conflating with a peak of enjoyment as opposed to saying every day thereafter was “bad,” I have to go back to Mists of Pandaria to find a real happy time… which is odd because I was pretty dismissive of MoP when it was announced and didn’t buy the expansion until nearly a year after it went live.  Meanwhile, Warlords of Draenor, with orcs as the bad guys yet again, that I was up for.

So perhaps missed or misplaced expectations were the real problem?

Nah, garrisons just sucked.

Anyway, as the quote at the top says, you can never know if that last good day is happening as it happens.  You can only identifying it in comparison to the days that come later.  The question is whether or not there is a peak of enjoyment waiting for me in WoW Legion or if I have simply had that last good day already.  I guess I have a few months to consider that, but I am feeling doubtful right now.

Picture of the Day – Attack Chopper Cat

Gaff has belatedly wandered back to World of Warcraft with the rest of us.  He can now join us in our wait for Warlords of Draenor.  But he is just getting started with Mists of Pandaria, so he has a little while until he hits level cap.  His druid was the first of his characters into Pandaria, and he was in cat form when he jumped into the gyrocopter strafing mission.

Attack Cats are Go!

Attack Cats are Go!

I cannot tell if he is calling for blood or just terrified.  That is not a naturally tenable position for a cat.

Making the Jump into Pandaria

After the previous weeks run through three instances, the group had all ascended to level 85.   That left us with some choices as to how to proceed.

The minimal completionist path was to at least take on the Twilight Highlands long enough to get to Grim Batol, the last normal mode instance in Cataclysm, before heading off to Pandaria.  The argument for this would be that we could at least say we had “done” Cataclysm by some very basic measure.

The “onward and upward” path would take us directly into Mists of Pandaria, bypassing the remains of CataclysmCata becomes a “fly over” expansion, and we are in and out in the minimum time.  And why not?  Pandaria has more than enough group content to keep us going at least out to the inevitable group summer hiatus, and probably enough to last us until Warlords of Draenor finally makes its way to us.

And then there was what I will call “the middle path” in our discussions.  This was the idea that we should take our time at level 85 and knock out some or all of the heroic-only five person instances that were included in Cataclysm.  I was all excited about the idea of Heroic Deadmines back in August 2009, it might be reasonable to follow up on that and see what came of it.  Pandaria isn’t going anywhere, and Draenor isn’t close.  Why not hang around in Cataclysm for a while?

In the end, the argument for the middle path hinged on a bag.  Specifically, the Tattered Hexcloth Bag.


We are, as always in World of Warcraft, suffering for lack of bag and bank space.  And the promise of 24 slot bag as a quest reward from Zul’Aman, one of the level 70 raids converted into a five person heroic instance for Cataclysm, was like the lure of shoes to Lee’s army before Gettysburg.   We will go a fair bit out of our way for that.

Plus there is the allure of this instance, and its companion Zul’Gurub, as large, sprawling affairs that could eat up a whole evenings adventuring.  We would view that as a good thing. (And I know some people are unhappy about the conversion of these raids to five person instances, but it looks awesome from where I sit as somebody who only does the five person group content.)

The only hitch is that the two converted raids are flagged as “Level 85++” and, frankly, we just aren’t that good.

So the amended plan for the middle path included a brief foray into Pandaria to get that first round of gear when the time was right.  We didn’t think we would need it for Grim Batol, but it would help with Heroic Deadmines and would likely be a necessity for the converted raids.  We would hold off on the Pandaria thing as long as possible.

And then Earl was away this past weekend and we couldn’t think of anything else to do, so we went into Pandaria early.  Go us.

Our roster for the evening was:

  • Skronk – Level 85 Dwarf Priest Healing
  • Bungholio – Level 85 Gnome Warlock DPS
  • Alioto – Level 85 Night Elf Druid DPS
  • Ula – Level 85 Gnome Mage DPS

And we all had the lead-in quest for Pandaria, so we headed off to meet up with Sky Admiral Rogers.

Meeting the Skymarshal

Meeting the Sky Admiral

Musings on the intro to Pandaria after the cut.  If you have been there, you are pretty much excused for reading further.

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An Embarrassment of Options…

I find myself in a very different position game-wise than I was in just a month back.

With the return of the instance group to World of Warcraft I have found my “to do” list for the game growing out of control.

The odd bit is that, each time I complete something on my list, it seems to spawn a couple more items.

For example, I wanted to get my pally, who is my main “do all the things” character, through Pandaria and up to level 90.


That was a simple achievement based goal that would allow me to see a good stretch of the expansion… though not as much as I thought I would see… and put at least one character at the top of the heap, ready for the next expansion, and able to indulge in whatever level cap things Blizzard had laid out.

Easy stuff.  I figured it wouldn’t take too much of my time and I might be in danger of running out of things I wanted to do.

Instead, upon getting to 90, I have found myself:

  • Finishing up the zone quest lines one by one.
  • Running dailies for various factions because I want items they offer (usually mounts). The Order of the Cloud Serpent are at the top of the list.
  • Harvesting for sales at the auction house, as all them mounts cost money.
  • Harvesting to get engineering up to 600 (at 590 now) so I can build some of the neat things available, such as the Blingtron 4000.  Motes of Harmony and trillium are my main obstacles at the moment.
  • Running Timeless Isle when I can get Pia to come play, to gear myself and a few alts up.  And achievements.  And general “oooh, lookit that!” fun.  And dying.
  • Running scenarios with Earl.  Did one over the weekend and it went well, so I want to try others.

All of which could easily take up my play time budget.  There are a lot of dailies in Pandaria.  It wasn’t very hard for me to get the Every Day I’m Pan-da-ren achievement.  I managed it before I found a bunch of the daily quests.

However, on top of that,there is also the official guild group.  I have been working on Alioto, both to learn how to play the feral druid DPS role better, since we’ll be hitting Cataclysm instances soon, and to work on inscription, the latter being both useful to the group and mildly lucrative.

Then there is also the unofficial second guild group.  The four of us who play regularly have alts that are in the 68 to 70 range that have been playing together now and again when we have all been on.  I have a level 70 druid there as well, in the healing role.  He healed his way through Burning Crusade instances.  Since he also has inscription as a trade skill, I am thinking about dropping that and picking up mining, which would be more lucrative but which would mean going back and skilling up again.

After which there is my hunter, Tistann, who is sitting at 85 now and ready to jump into Pandaria.  Something about wanting a second character at level cap and seeing the content as a ranged player rather than in the melee role.

Then there is a Draenei Death Knight I have pulled out of storage, Tokarev, because I am sort of interested in running the Outland instances as a tank.  He is 60 and ready to embark.  We’ll see if I can find time for him.  He might be a candidate for my insta-90 character in Warlords of Draenor if I don’t.

Finally, there is every other alt I have on the server, which falls at the low end of my hierarchy of things I want to do.  No real plans there, but they all stare at me when I am logging in, wondering when they will next be able to come out and play.  And then there are the characters on other servers.

On top of all of that, there are at least a half a dozen sort of general blog posts about WoW I want to write based on having returned to the game, which are in addition to the “I did a thing” posts that I write.  Sorry in advance on that, both because the topic of WoW will likely dominate the post count for a while and because I will be writing from the perspective of somebody who has come back to the game after a long absence and will thus end up writing more than a few things that will be blindingly obvious to those who never left.

And while the rush back to Azeroth was all sparked by the Warlords of Draenor announcement at BlizzCon early last month, I find myself in no hurry to get to the next expansion.   Unlike many people, WoD could come too soon for me, being as invested as I am in my own little plans at the moment and feeling like there is still some catching up to do.  We shall see.  I am still excited about the expansion, but there is so much to do!

Other games, of course, will suffer because of this.  War Thunder has fallen by the wayside.  I am back to doing fleets on demand only in EVE Online.  I am good for fleet ops and jump in on that, but there is no time for mining or ratting or what not there.  Meanwhile, things like skill trees in Lord of the Rings Online, updates in Rift, nostalgia in EverQuest, and any thoughts about GuildWars 2 are all off the back burner in stored away in the fridge at this point.

Of course, that could all change.  Burn out is a surprisingly easy point to reach.  But for now I am happy, the rest of the guild seems invested in WoW for the moment as well, so we can make plans, talk, and play together.

Addendum: And as Cuppy reminded me, Pet Battles are also on my list somewhere.  See, more stuff just keeps popping up.

Greetings from the Timeless Isle… of DEATH!

I am not sure what I expected to Timeless Isle to be.

When it came into the game with patch 5.0.4 one of my higher level friends who had been playing with us on Garnoa, leveling up a new character, ran off to try it out and was never seen again in the 1-60 area of the game where we were playing.  She would occasionally link some purple item that dropped with stats that seemed impossibly high to somebody rolling around doing level 30 content.  But I figured it must have been fun since it occupied all of her game time.

Then the instance group made its way back to Azeroth, I actually rolled on into Pandaria and made it to level 90, and suddenly the Timeless Isle was a possibility.  I could actually go there… once I figured out how to get there.  There is a quest.  Chromie sends you there, though she is hiding.  Her “?” on the mini-map shows up over an instance entrance, but she is actually behind a parapet above that and not visible unless you are above her.

Chromie at rest

Chromie at rest

I found her, eventually, and she sent me off… to die.

Like I said, I hadn’t actually read anything tangible about the Timeless Isle, so I did not know what to expect.  A number of people have discussed the rewards. But the content?  Not so much.

I guess that I expected it to be something like Ember Isle in Rift, something of an additional area to occupy level cap players that was incrementally more difficult, but still primarily solo in focus.

Instead I wound up on an island consisting of extra tough normal mobs, extra tough elite mobs, and named mobs that a simple group of five would be hard pressed to dent.  The first real quest on the island, which just send you on a tour, had me running through groups of hostile elites which killed me repeatedly.  And the island is a “no fly” zone, so you cannot avoid all those hostiles wandering the grounds.

I managed to finish that and the next quest before I had died so many times I was getting the paper doll warning that my equipment was in danger of running out of durability.

Timeless Isle may be many things, but it isn’t a solo playground for those with quest drop gear.

Being clearly out of my depth, I sought professional help.  More rambling and some silly pictures after the cut.

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I Might Have Binged on WoW Recently…

My paladin from the original instance group, the one I raced ahead with.  Well he is done racing ahead for now, at least when it comes to levels.


I started him into Pandaria pretty much as soon as it became clear that the instance group was going to come back to World of Warcraft.  In my first post about that the week after BlizzCon I noted that he was already level 87 and that I would be substituting another character into the group to replace him.

So, basically, I went from 85 to 90 in about a week and a half.  And while that sounds very quick, I did play a lot of WoW during that time.  There is no War Thunder post this week because I skipped that.  I barely did anything in EVE Online except move to Curse.  I did not even work on alts in WoW once I got Alioto to 80 so he could join the instance group.  I was unusually focused on playing through Mists of Pandaria.  I jumped right into it… which is almost literally how you start there.  And I had a full ration of blue bar which, thanks to always logging out in town or at an inn, lasted nearly to the end.  I did not “feel normal” until I was at half way through level 89.

No, really, jumping into Pandaria

No, really, jumping into Pandaria

I did consume quite a bit of content along the way.  I finished out the quests for the story line in the Jade Forest, the Valley of the Four Winds, and the Krasarang Wilds, ending up well into the Kun-Lai Summit story line, out by the Chow Farmstead, before my experience bar disappeared.  In addition, I also ran four of the dungeons as part of normal mode Dungeon Finder groups.  I hit the Stormstout Brewery, the Temple of the Jade Serpent, the Mogu’Shan Palace, and the Shadow-pan Monastery one time each.



So what was it like?

It was nice.  The quest lines are very much in the Cataclysm 80-85 mode, where there is an over-arcing story to the zone.  There are a lot more cut scenes and, unlike in Cataclysm, where every zone had its own story, the stories merge between the zones in Pandaria.  And the stories are engaging, the characters are amusing, and beer figures prominently.  If you do not like achievements popping up though, Pandaria won’t make you any happier.  In addition to the normal achievements for completing zone quest lines, there are progress pop-ups that tell you that you have finished a given segment of the story line.  Instead of a raw quest completion count, they track those segments for the zone achievement, and you cannot turn them off.

The overland zones are still very solo oriented.  There is still phasing.  I am concerned at how our group will do with the overland content.  But running around by myself was fun.  The quests are more varied than the old days.  You still end up killing 10 of this and 10 of that, but there is a mix of other non-FedEx style quests.  And the Valley of the Four Winds is practically The Shire if you enjoy domestic chores and the like.  And, I tell you true, there is a woman out there that will demand that you attend to her giant melons.  She is quite insistent.

Also, I killed a giant bug and, thanks to phasing, it’s dead corpse is still sitting in the zone.  I find it oddly satisfying to see it still there after the battle.

The instances were also fun enough.  I came in as DPS via Dungeon Finder, the mode was the usual random group “run, run, run” mode, but there seemed to be a variety of different boss encounters.  I look forward to actually being able to appreciate them when the instance group gets there and goes through them at a slow to moderate pace.

Pandaria is also very pretty, perhaps the pretties place in Azeroth.  And the Valley of the Four Winds isn’t just Shire-like in its quests, it is also a beautiful and lush green valley.  Just replace pandas with hobbits, sink a few hobbit holes, and you are set.

I was interested to see that my gear wasn’t instantly obsolete the moment I jumped into the expansion.  In fact, the gear I had from trying to get into the Fall of Theramore that preceded Pandaria remained better than green drops until Kun-Lai Summit, though I did pick up some nice instance blues that were clearly a step up.  Meanwhile, the numbers in Pandaria seem out of hand.  It is like dealing with ISK in EVE Online, you start to wonder if you counted too many zeroes.  Of course, I just came from playing in the 1-60 experience, so suddenly seeing myself do 15K DPS might just be comparison shock.  Still, I see why they are thinking about doing the item squish as part of the gear revamp for Warlords of Draenor.

Overall I am having fun.  My initial aversion to panda cuteness went away pretty quickly.  I still plan to move forward and finish the story line, collecting gold rather than experience along the way.  And there are all sorts of other aspects to the Mists of Pandaria expansion I have yet to explore.

That said, if you had any thought about this expansion moving the game back towards World of Warcraft of 2006, you will be disappointed.  Overland is very solo oriented, phasing is still a thing (though it isn’t used as much as I thought it might be, every battle doesn’t go away after you finish your bit), achievements are still a very big thing, pop-culture references abound including playing with nearly every martial arts movie trope that ever was, and I do not know enough about Chinese culture to be able to draw the line between treating it with respect and being culturally insensitive.  I haven’t seen any serious outrage over the expansion, but I have no idea how it played in China either.  (And we’ve been okay with trolls talking about voodoo and sounding like they are from Jamaica for 9 years, so maybe that ship has sailed.)

So I will carry on, though I will probably spend some more time with alts going forward.  I have that other druid in the midst of Burning Crusade content, which is where one of the unofficial guild alt groups is currently questing, not to mention half a dozen other characters at various states of development on that server alone.

And, as a wrap up, a few screen shots from along the path to 90.