Tag Archives: Orwell

Google Plus Ungood Securewise

Alternate Headline: Users unbellyfeel Google prolefeed, becomes unservice.

It is probably just me that saw the Newspeak potential in the demise of Google Plus.

That attempt at humor aside, the word has gone out from the Googleplex in Mountain View that Google Plus will be no more.  Or that the consumer version of the product will be no more following a 10 month wind down, meaning that it will be gone at some point in August of 2019.  Google says that the enterprise version of Google Plus will continue.  Color me surprised that there was such a thing or that any enterprise outside of Google actually uses it, but they say “many” do.  I guess it is likely better than whatever Microsoft is pushing lately.  It is certainly better than anything Cisco has on offer.

The reason given for the closure in the news headlines involves a security flaw that could have potentially exposed the data for over half a million accounts.  The data exposed was limited to optional items entered in your Google profile (which is semi-public to start with unless you lock it down) and Google says it has no evidence that the flaw had been exploited.  But data breaches make for more views, so you may find your local news source pitching this as a stolen data panic.

The real reason for the closure is a little less dramatic.

Given these challenges and the very low usage of the consumer version of Google+, we decided to sunset the consumer version of Google+.

Basically, so few people use Google Plus that it isn’t worth the effort needed to keep it secure.  They didn’t just say “low” usage but “very low” usage.  You’ll probably get no greater admission of failure than that.  If it has been popular they would have kept it open.  But now they have an excuse to shut it down.

Of course, part of me cheered at the news.  I am old, have a long memory, and have been prone at times to carry resentments long past their expiration dates, so I continue to see Google Plus as the reason that Google killed off the much loved and still missed (by me at least) Google Reader.  It has been more than five years since that happened and I am still annoyed by it and I still haven’t found a replacement that did all Google Reader did at its peak.  Some twisted logic in the back of my brain sees this as justice for the late idolized RSS reader.

But a bit of me is bemused by the change.  As it turns out, I actually check Google Plus pretty much daily.  There are a few people I follow there, including Richard Bartle, that make it worth the effort. The updates aren’t rapid, so it is something I check once or twice a day at most, but I do check it.

I also syndicate my blog feed there as well and get the occasional response, so there is life out there still.  But the activity isn’t anywhere close to what it was during the early days of the service, which in itself wasn’t that much compared to the competition, which is and always was Facebook.  Nobody is saying Google Plus influenced the last election or anything else.

So I suppose I will miss it.  And I know that it going away won’t magically bring back Google Reader, so my missing it will be genuine.  You can’t blame a company for shutting down a service that few use and which brings in no revenue.  The same goes for Google Reader as well.  And iGoogle.  And Google Insights.  And Orkut.  Man, what is it with me and dead Google products?

And so it goes.  We’ll see how it winds down between now and August.

Friday Inaugural Bullet Points

Today we get a new president, the 10th in my lifetime and the third during the life of the blog.  The state government here in California has declared itself opposed in all ways possible to the new president, which I find mildly amusing because the last governor of the state was Arnold Schwarzenegger and in the last election we not only failed ban the death penalty, most voters actually went for the ballot initiative that promised to speed up the process of killing.  How very liberal we are.

Back on the video game front, it is a rainy Friday morning and I have a few small stories I want to mention but which are probably not worth a whole post.  None of them, to my knowledge, involve the new president.

Pokemon Billionaires

An article up over at Venture Beat gives the total 2016 revenue for Pokemon Go as $950 million.  For a game that launched on July 6th of 2016, that is a pretty impressive take.  To put that into MMO perspective, World of Warcraft was raking in over a billion dollars a year at its peak, but nowhere near double Pokemon Go’s six month total.

PokemonGO_500px

Now, of course, there are a lot of “buts” to that story.  The earnings were very much front loaded, with the initial $600 million coming in the first 90 days before revenues began to taper off.  This isn’t going to be a year over year Juggernaut like WoW.   And, of course, revenue isn’t cash in the pocket.  Apple takes their cut off the top, then Niantic takes theirs, after which they pay the Pokemon Company their licensing cut, from which eventually Nintendo gets some money.

But for the meager amount of effort Nintendo put in to the whole thing, it did pay mighty dividends, boosting sales of other Pokemon games and even of 3DS hardware.  Even if everybody stops playing Pokemon Go tomorrow, Nintendo, Game Freak, and the Pokemon Company have done very well out of the deal.

Hero’s Song Refund

We heard the tale of the end of Hero’s Song late last month as Smed’s first post SOE/Daybreak gaming venture had to fold up its tents and call it a day.  The game walked a troubled path, with a failed Kickstarter campaign and, later, an Indiegogo campaign that fell short of the funding target.  But with Indiegogo you get to keep the money pledged, even if you don’t make your goal, so Pixelmage got some money out of the deal.  It just wasn’t enough to carry on.

Then Pixelmage did the unexpected and said they would give people their money back.  And they did.  I got my refund via PayPal for the two licenses I bought.

Refund

Refund

Not every crowd-funded project is going to have the luxury of doing that, but it is nice to see one make the effort when they had the means.

Refund Splurge

So there I had $28 in my PayPal wallet, and I never carry a balance with PayPal, so I turned around and blew the whole lot on three games from Steam wish list.  I grabbed Orwell (plus the soundtrack), Atlantic Fleet, and Death Ray Manta.  So those, along with my Steam Winter Sale purchases, give me a small pile of games to work on.

Ruse of the Day

One of the things that Pandemic Legion does is put out invites to high profile players in other groups.  Asher reports that he has three such invites to different corps in PL.  Apparently gigX,  the leader of Circle-of-Two, took one of those invites, joined ElitistOps, (which has been part of GoonSwarm, Band of Brothers, and Pandemic Legion) and then let his mates in CO2 blow up three of his capital ships (Moros, Apostle, and Revelation) just to mess with their kill board stats before rejoining CO2.  Was it worth it?

New Eden Good News/Bad News

Elsewhere on the EVE Online front, we got a look into what is coming up in the game, which includes the ability to insure ships in citadels finally.  On the down side, the game has been experiencing rubberbanding, latency, and desync issues since the last patch.  CCP is working on that, but it isn’t fixed just yet.

So that is all I have.  Back to the rains here.  We only seem to have two settings in our part of the state; drought or deluge.  At least during the deluge I can take a nice long shower.

Most Inapt Orwellian Reference of the Week

Wolfshead’s anti-WoW and anti-Blizzard sentiments are well known… erm… well, they are known if you read his blog in any case.  And if you read his blog, you might have notice a tendency over-state things or blow them out of proportion.

So of course, in his view, Blizzard isn’t moderating their forums, something most game companies do to do to keep them from becoming unreadable cesspits, they are attempting to “sanitize opinion.”

Not unexpected from somebody who feels the need to put the worst possible spin on all things Blizzard, though you might wonder WHY he cares about their forums in the first place.  That seems like an unhealthy obsession.

But the killer is the sign off line, “Big Brother is watching you.”

Is he saying that Blizzard is actually reading posts in their own forums?

The mind boggles.

First, I am pretty sure that he has opined in the past that Blizzard pays no attention whatsoever to player feedback, so I suppose this is an inadvertent compliment from him.

Second, Big Brother in 1984 is the supreme dictator who keeps his society under constant surveillance.  How does that compare to Blizzard paying attention to what people write in the forums they provide?  Ruthless exploitative dictator versus video game company has to rank high on the bad analogy chart.

Or is this one of those bogus “freedom of speech” notions?