Tag Archives: Survey

Who Says I am Calm, Spontaneous, and Grounded?

Nick Yee says that about me… sort of.

Nick Yee, famous… for specific, internet definitions of fame… getting a Reddit AMA counts for something… his studies of gamers, and MMO gamers in particular, through such ventures as the The Daedalus Project and PARC PlayOn Group (as well as that WoW guild name generator) has a new research venture going on.  A note in my inbox yesterday included this announcement:

I’ve got some exciting news to share! Our game analytics consulting practice is now officially “Quantic Foundry”. And the gamer research project is now officially “The Quantic Lab”. Apart from running surveys and sharing the findings, we have also created a Gamer Motivation Profile that produces a customized report of your gaming motivations.

Check out the blog posts, take the new surveys, and try the Gamer Motivation Profile at: https://apps.quanticfoundry.com

A new survey!

Gamer Motivation Profile sounds suspiciously like the whole Bartle Test thing I suppose.  However, this new survey is at least functionally a bit different.  Where as the Bartle Test asks the taker to choose between pairs of behaviors to determine if you were an explorer, achiever, socializer, or killer, the Gamer Motivation Profile asks the taker to rank the importance to them of a series of aspects of gaming that range from “Blowing stuff up” to knowing the game’s story.

Different, but not necessarily better.  It is much easier to make choices between two behaviors than it is to rank the importance of a given aspect of gaming… at least it was for me.  You have to be a lot more in touch with what is important to you.

Anyway, once you take it you get your results and, if you sign up for an account, you also get a profile you can share with others.  Mine is here.  My basic summary is the title of this post, and the top level graph shows:

My profile summary graph

My profile summary graph

Nothing really dominates on that graph… not like Tipa’s graph, where immersion was sticking out prominently.  The results are percentiles, where I rank against other gamers.  Basically, 88% of gamers are more action oriented than I.

This probably results from me not pressing on things being at the “extremely important” end of the spectrum.  I picked that answer only once.

So Achievement and Social dominate, Immersion and Strategy are on par, and Action is way down the ladder for me.

Each of the groups is then broken out into sub-categories.  For Action there is Destruction and Excitement.

Action sub-categories

Action sub-categories

See, I do like to blow things up, I’m just not big on excitement.  I think my wife can confirm that.

For Strategy there is Mastery and Planning.

Strategy sub-categories

Strategy sub-categories

About equal on both of those.

For Achievement it is Completion and Power.

Achievement sub-categories

Achievement sub-categories

I could have told you I am far more about “doing all the things” than I am about power.

For Social there is Competition and Community.

Social sub-categories

Social sub-categories

I have been known to go on about community, right?  If somebody asks why, in EVE Online, I am in The Imperium with those horrible Goons, community is the answer.  For all you can say about them, they are pretty much dedicated to community and organizing groups that allow the individual to feel like a contributing part of that community.  My home is in Reavers, a group small enough that showing up really matters but large enough that I can’t really screw things up for the team, and I enjoy my time playing with that group.

And then, finally, there is that most illogical and fractious of terms, a word that has as many meanings as there are people who utter it, Immersion.  That actually breaks out into three, Customization, Fantasy, and Story.

Immersion cub-categories

Immersion cub-categories

Customization and Story… not so important to me I guess.  I actually have a half-finished post in my drafts folder about why story is important in MMORPGs, but how it shouldn’t override your own story.

And while I have shown some interest in customization… I use cosmetic gear slots all the time, I painted up all my cars in Need for Speed World, and I just spent a bunch of ISK on ship skins the other day in EVE Online… I tend to view that as a luxury as opposed to a necessity I suppose.

Fantasy, on the other hand… there things suddenly get important.  I will quote the summary for that sub-category:

Gamers who score high on Fantasy want their gaming experiences to allow them to become someone else, somewhere else. They enjoy the sense of being immersed in an alter ego in a believable alternate world, and enjoy exploring a game world just for the sake of exploring it. These gamers enjoy games like Skyrim, Fallout, and Mass Effect for their fully imagined alternate settings.

Except that I don’t enjoy those titles all that much… well, I only own Skyrim, but I would put Mass Effect in as a placehold for “BioWare games”  in general… because they lack the social and community aspect.  Online games have ruined me forever on a lot of solo games.

So there I am, a completionist and community (or at least group) focused player that wants to get lost in the games I play.

And while I suspect that my results might vary if I took the survey again in a few months… or next week… or tomorrow… or right now… I think that the same key points would likely shine through still.

Anyway, if you want to take the survey you can find the starting link over the Quandric Foundry Lab page.

Addendum: There is also a blog post on the site about how they created the survey.

The Elder Scrolls Online Wants My Opinion, But Only if I am Quick About it!

The launch of The Elder Scrolls Online came and went back in April.

I played a bit during the beta.  Not that much, just enough for me to get the flavor of the game which, in my narrow point of view on the subject, was an Elder Scrolls game.  The necessary elements were there.

But since I am not a huge fan of the whole Elder Scrolls series, I opted not to buy the game.  It just wasn’t for me, and that was fine.  On to other things.

Bethesda though, they noted that I played in the beta but then didn’t drop $60 on a box, virtual or otherwise.

Late Monday evening they dropped me a note to find out why.  It was a request to take a survey.

Asking for Feedback

Asking for Feedback

It arrived too late for me to consider taking at that moment, and Tuesday turned out to be a very busy day.  But Wednesday morning I had a moment free, so I got out the email and pulled up a blank document for notes to see what they had to ask.

I wanted to give them an honest assessment as well as seeing how they structured their survey.  Bad surveys can be amusing while good ones can be almost as instructive for those taking it as those administering it.

So I clicked on the “start survey” link and… got this:

You snooze, you lose...

You snooze, you lose…

Apparently they had enough responses… or weren’t that interested… or had some sort of artificial time limit.

So they may never find out why I was not among the reported 772,374 people who did join them in Tamriel

LOTRO Survey – Not for 64-bit

Turbine sent me an email asking me to take a survey.  They want to make the game better and all that.

Aragorn wants to know what you think!

The poll starts off in a common enough way.  They ask about what game systems you own, what gaming and news sites you read, what MMOs you’re aware of, and what MMOs you play.

Then, once you’ve gone through a couple of layers of that, the poll put up a confidentiality agreement.

They want to show you something new and cool.  You can’t tell anybody, but they want to know what you think.

You just have to download this plugin for your browser.

Only that plugin doesn’t work with 64-bit operating systems.

No special secret cool preview thingy for me I guess.

I have to wonder how this will skew their results?

I am going to guess that you’re more hardcore gamer is going to have gone for 64-bit to be able to access more RAM.

Anyway, the future path of LOTRO is apparently in the hands of those with 4GB or less of RAM in their system.

STO – Take a Survey, Get a Klingon

I got a note this morning from Cryptic about Star Trek Online.

They wanted me to take a survey!

We’d like to know more about you!

How often do you play the games you love? For that matter, what games do you love? What’s the one thing you’d change about Star Trek Online, if you could?

We’ve put together a special Star Trek Online player survey to learn how we can better tailor the game to your needs. If you visit our special survey page, you’ll find a few questions for you to answer. If you complete the survey, we’ll send you 240 Cryptic Points for your trouble.

This survey is open only to people who have purchased and applied a valid Star Trek Online retail key to their account, and you can only fill it out once, so make your answers count.

240 Cryptic points for taking the survey.  Hey, I would have given them my opinion for nothing, but if they want to give me something, so much the better.

And 240 Cryptic points happens to be the the price to unlock Klingons as a playable Federation race.  So here we are a month after release and they have given us a freebie… unless, of course, you’ve already purchased the Klingons.

Personally, I am going to save those 240 points for something else.  As cool as Michael Dorn is, and he is cool, my Star Trek dreams involve being Kirk, or maybe Riker, but not Worf.

Anyway, if you’re a paid up subscriber, go check your inbox (and spam folder) for the survey.  The questions are a bit light… a bit too light if you ask me… but it only takes a minut