Tag Archives: Teamfight Tactics

My Games Played for 2019

I realize that we’re only a few days into December at this point, leaving almost 8% of the year left to go, but there are also only so many days in a month and I had nothing else brewing for a post, so I am going to run with this a bit earlier that usual  This is where I look at, in a broad sense, which games I ended up playing in 2019 relative to what I thought I might play.

Back at the start of January I wrote a post about what I thought I might end up playing, so this is the nearly end of year follow up to that post.  There is something of a tradition around here with this sort of post, going back years at this point.

The list used to be largely about new games that I was going to play.  And then at some point it became clear that I don’t really play that many new games anymore.  But that is the essence of MMORPGs, that they want to keep you playing for years.  Op success for them I guess.  So now it is more about which stale old title I am going to linger on for yet another trip around the sun.

Back in January I broke my picks out into a few bands of likelihood.  Up first were the safe bets:

  • EVE Online
  • WoW Classic
  • WoW Battle for Azeroth
  • Lord of the Rings Online

And, I was pretty bang on with that list.  EVE Online got play time through the whole year.  WoW Classic has been a big play time favorite since it launched in late August.  WoW Battle for Azeroth was not neglected, though I still haven’t unlocked flying for the expansion, the measure of whether or not you really played by some accounts.  And I did kick off the year still invested in the LOTRO Legendary server idea, though that faded at some point in Moria.

After that there were the “somewhat likely” titles, which were:

  • EverQuest II
  • Project: Gorgon
  • Minecraft

EverQuest II was a last minute winner, getting more play time last month than anything else.  And I did dive into Minecraft when searching for stuff that came with the Village and Pillage update.  But Project: Gorgon, that remains unplayed.  I think it might be time to admit that I am just not going to find the time for it.

Finally, there were the wildcards, things I thought that might find their way into my rotation.  That list was:

  • EverQuest
  • Atlas
  • Torchlight Frontiers
  • Camelot Unchained
  • Destiny 2
  • Diablo III
  • War Thunder and/or World of Tanks
  • Something Else New

Out of that list I played EverQuest.  I jumped in and played on a live server for the 20th anniversary in March, explored some new places, struggled with the layers of interface options the game has accumulated over two decades, and generally had a good time.

And that was it.  I never touched AtlasTorchlight Frontiers and Camelot Unchained remain as yet unrealized.  I am at the point where I’m wondering if I should apply for a refund on the latter.  It doesn’t seem like it will be a thing anytime soon.  Activision gave me a free copy of Destiny 2 and then it went away before I could be bothered to even launch it.  Diablo III I’ve played enough of.  War Thunder I am just so terrible at that I couldn’t be bothered to install it again, and I thought about Word of Tanks, but never pressed the button.

As for “something else new” I must have been making a joke, right?

Well, as long as we get away from MMOs and such, I did try a couple of new items.  On the other games list I said I would probably play the following:

  • Civilization V
  • RimWorld
  • Age of Empires II: The Age of Kings

And I did, in fact, spend some time playing all three of those.  But I also played:

  • Path of Exile
  • Diablo (via GoG.com)
  • Microsoft Solitaire
  • Defense Grid: The Awakening
  • StarCraft (original)
  • Dota Underlords
  • Teamfight Tactics
  • Combat Mission: Barbarossa to Berlin

Those all came and went in short bursts of activity, usually centered on some event.   Path of Exile had a new season and some friends wanted to play.  However, the people in the group who were into it raced ahead and those of us who hadn’t touched the game for a few years ended up somewhat lost in the new mechanics added over time.  For me PoE isn’t as compelling as Diablo III or WoW to play solo, so I let it drop.

The original Diablo got a GoG.com remaster, which means they made it work on Windows 10, so I ran through that.  It was good fun.  StarCraft got a Carbot skin, which was enough for me to drag it out and play with it for a bit.

Microsoft Solitaire is pre-loaded with Win10.  I tried it for a bit as something to do while waiting for an op to get going in EVE Online.  It wasn’t all that special, and when it started prompting me to pay, I was done.

Then there was the late summer Auto Chess/Auto Battler round up, where I tried out Dota Underlords and Teamfight Tactics.  They are kind of fun, but in using the heroes from their respective parent games, DOTA 2 and League of Legends, remained a bit too close to their core player base to interest me.

I got Defense Grid: The Awakening, a great tower defense game, during the Steam Summer Sale to earn a badge by unlocking an achievement.  I think that explains a bit of Civ V as well, though you can never play just a “bit” of Civ VAge of Empires II HD probably came in as part of that as well, though there was also the launch of the Age of Empires II Definitive Edition that might have sparked some interest there.

And every once in a while when I feel like something akin to old school table top war games I drag out Combat Mission: Barbarossa to Berlin, perhaps the best game in the Combat Mission series.  I’m not a fan of their new engine and they no longer sell the old games, support being an issue.  But my copy still works.

With all of that, here is that annual chart that shows what I played and when.

2019 games played by month

I tried to shade partial months when time played was lot.  Also, this is clearly not the hours played evaluation that my usage of ManicTime has made possible.  I will have to wait until the new year to sum that up.  What I played is easier to do early than something based on real numbers.

EVE Online I played some every month.  There is some pressure to get credit for the corp by going on some ops every month, and I help out with that.

I am a bit surprised by how much retail WoW I played.  I guess I did get into the new content and leveled an alt to 120 and all that.  But that pretty much fell off a cliff when WoW Classic hit.

LOTRO also fell off a cliff once I got into Moria on the Legendary server.  I loved the original content, even in its modern form, and even Moria isn’t so bad, but everything after that is pretty much dead to me.

I figured I would play some EverQuest II, but I wasn’t sure if I would find some way to enjoy EverQuest during its 20th anniversary.  But I found a way.

RimWorld remains a solid time eater when I pick it up.  However, it does suffer a bit from the mid-game problem.  You hit a point where things are pretty balanced, you have supplies to last you through downturns and your defenses are good enough to thwart attacks and you’re just kind of waiting for research breakthroughs.  I started a primitive tech game… well, I started about a dozen until my group didn’t die out in the first two years… but that just pushes the mid-game back some, so eventually there is refrigeration and defense turrets and assault rifle production and you’re just working your way to the end game.

So that is what I played in 2019, for a specific definition of the word.  I decided not to bring mobile into the mix… Pokemon Go would just be another 12 month bar and I don’t record when I play anything else… and I left off a few where the play time was so small as to fall below my own mental threshold what ought to count.

Teamfight Tactics vs Dota Underlords

I have now spent several hours playing both games and I am here to break it down for you, to give you the full and detailed exposition as to how Teamfight Tactics and Dota Underlords are different.

It comes down to one thing and one thing only.

In Dota Underlords, you place your heroes on squares.

Dota Underlords is squared up

In Teamfight Tactics you place your heroes on hexagons.

Teamfight Tactics will put a hex on you

That is it.  Otherwise the games are literally so similar that if you didn’t know better you would swear that one of them copied the other wholesale.

Of course, we do know better.  We know that both of them were copied from the Auto Chess mod for DOTA 2, which is what launched the Auto Battler genre.

But seriously, the game play is exactly the same.  You’re matched up in groups of eight, you earn gold to buy heroes, buying three of the same hero yields an upgrade, you put your heroes on the board and watch while they fight some NPCs for a couple of rounds before being matched up against the other players you’ve been grouped up with, and so on and so forth.  Heroes are also part of two or three groups, and having multiples of those groups on your team give them boosts.  Battles play out before you and, at least half the time I cannot really tell why I win or lose.

So most of what I wrote last month about Dota Underlords applies to Teamfight Tactics as well.

Right now neither is monetized, but that will change soon enough, and both feel like they need some tuning.

Anyway, that is about all… what?  What are you saying there?

Okay, stop your howling.  There are, in fact, some other differences between the two.  I’ll tick off a few of the differences… and maybe even help you choose which one you ought to try.

Teamfight Tactics is somewhat hidden in the League of Legends client, so you need to have that and an active LoL account, and the ability to find the game therein.  There are a couple of things that seem to be telling you it isn’t available on the landing page.

The hub is down, but the game is there

You need to click the play button, then select PvP (because nothing else in LoL is PvP? I don’t understand?) and you’ll find the button to launch TFT.

On clicking the button, then another, you’ll get grouped up with seven other people, at least one of which will forget to click the accept button, and the grouping thing will have to run again until you finally get into a group five tries later.  I don’t know why you have to click an accept button.  You cannot see, to my knowledge, who you are even playing.  This is why I assume people are simply forgetting to click rather than hitting the reject button.  I don’t know.  It seems like an unnecessary step.

Dota Underlords is on Steam, which means you need the Steam client and an active account, and is early access, which means it is effectively hidden from view more so than TFT.  But at least there is nothing telling you some aspect of the game is down.

DU launches as a stand alone game using your Steam account credentials.  You click the PLAY button, decide between tutorial, bots, and players, then wait a while while it matches you up.  Then, for a brief moment every single time it does something that looks like the whole process is about to fail, then suddenly you’re matched up.

TFT uses the champions from LoL, DU uses the heroes from DOTA 2, so if you play one of those already you are a step ahead of random people like myself.

TFT also has an odd start point where a bunch of champions are marching around in a circle and everybody has to run out and grab one.  That is your starter champion.  However, the champions do not have names visible nor can you click on them to get more information, so unless you know all the LoL champions it is something of a crap shoot.

TFT also, for reasons I do not quite get, gives you and avatar on the battlefield.  By default it is a little ghost that looks to be straight out of the Mario universe, though you can earn other versions.  I saw somebody who had a penguin.

My little ghost avatar

The ghost is what you use to grab heroes during what I am going to call “the circle jerk.”  Champions walk around in a circle and you jerk them onto your team.

Everybody grab your champion

You also use your little avatar to run out and grab drops from the NPC rounds.  Otherwise, your guy has no impact on the battle so you can run around during a fight to be annoying.   Sometimes I will accidentally right click on something which will send the avatar wandering off, sometimes off the board, which will drag the camera with it.  Annoying, but not something I would claim should steer you away from the game.

On the plus side, TFT does seem to be a bit more free with gold.  I never feel quite as cash constrained playing that as I do in DU.   Also, the pace in TFT seems a bit quicker, though that is in part because you seem to lose bigger as the game goes along so you are rarely lingering along in way behind in 8th place for many rounds.

That bigger win factor also means the tide can turn pretty heavily.  One match I won the first 9 rounds in a row.  I still was at 100 while the next highest player was at 56.  And then my advantage faded and I lost the next 6 in a row and was in sixth place and the lowest ranked survivor with only 4 points left.  And I managed to hold on and end up in fourth.  Wild turns of fate happen, and make the game interesting.

When it comes to Dota Underlords, one of the primary problems is that it isn’t as far along as TFT.  Neither feel done yet, but DU has been changing up quite a bit every week.  For example, even as I started writing this DU was updating to add a competitive ranked mode, something that TFT already had in place for a while.

But DU has what I feel are two big advantages over TFT.

First, DU is available on mobile.  I am rarely in a match where there isn’t somebody who has the cell phone icon indicating that they are playing on mobile.  I haven’t tried it myself yet, but my daughter says it is pretty good.  It might be a decent iPad game to play on the couch for me.

And second, and more important to me, the UI in DU is dramatically better.  It is more clear, more helpful, and much more informative that the TFT UI.

For example, if you look at the two game screen shots further up the post, it is easy to see which units in DU have been upgraded.  Normal units have one star above, the first upgrade has two, and the second upgrade gets you three.  Easy to see.  You need to click on units in TFT to see their status.

When buying units, if a unit in the list pops up that will complete a set for an upgrade, DU highlights that unit in an obvious way.  TFT doesn’t give away such hints.

Not getting a hint might not matter if the units in the buy list were easy to discern.  They are in DU, where they use the same avatar in the buy list, the reserve slots, and on the game board.  There are a couple that looks a little too similar, but I am able to discern most of them pretty easily so I know what to buy.

TFT on the other hand seems to want to punish you for not knowing all their champions by heart.  In the buy list TFT doesn’t use the field avatar.  Instead it uses a dramatic graphic of the unit, which doesn’t always look a lot like the champion on the field.

Units in the TFT buy list

I spend way too much of my time between matches trying to figure out if one of these champions on the list matches somebody on my team, which means matching names.  It is just a lot more work.  And then there is the above mentioned “circle jerk” event, which comes up every so often during a match, where you have to pick a champion based on no information at all… unless you know them all by heart.

And just beyond that, the UI in DU has larger, clearer text consistently throughout the game when compared to TFT.  The UI clarity is probably related to the fact that the game also runs on mobile, but even on the PC this is actually important to some of us old farts who now have to wear glasses to read text smaller than a certain size.  I don’t have to wear my glasses to play DU.

So if I were to recommend one these games to a new player who was not invested in LoL or DOTA 2, it would be Dota Underlords.

If you’re already invested in one of the MOBAs, then you play the spin-off that has the units you know.  If nothing else, deep knowledge of LoL champions will give you a marked advantage in TFT.

Of course, there is still Auto Chess Origins, the stand alone game from the team that made the Auto Chess mod for DOTA 2 that kicked all of this off.  And, given the buzz that the Auto Battler genre has been getting, I expect we will see more knocks offs, so there is still the potential for a Fortnite-like entry into the field with some special twist that will steal market focus away from the first round of games.  We shall see.