CCP Asks Vince Draken to Step Down from CSM12

CCP has asked CSM member Vince Draken to step down due to not being able to devote sufficient time to the council. Lack of activity can have valid reasons and we’re parting with Vince on good terms and with mutual understanding. CCP holds the obligation to ensure a fully engaged CSM at any given time which is why we are looking towards a substitute for the remainder of the term.

-CCP Guard, CSM Update

After the roller coaster rides of CSM9 and CSM10, with the leaks, the removals, and the recriminations, the two following councils have been quiet, almost dignified affairs.  CSM12 has been pretty quiet since its election earlier this year.

Round 12 in progress!

And even now, in the chill of the the last two councils, this barely qualifies as CSM drama.  The joke is that playing EVE Online seriously is like having a second job, and adding the CSM to your list gives you at least another part time job on top of the two you likely have.  So Vince Draken, already the leader of Northern Coalition, probably has enough on his plate already.  He’ll miss out on a week of sitting in a conference room in Iceland talking about various aspects of the game.

Meanwhile, there is a position to be filled.  CCP has said the following:

We will be calling in a substitute using the previously stated method of filling the spot with the last candidate eliminated in the election (the next in line without any recalculation of vote distribution). We’ll start there and go down the line if needed until someone accepts the spot and we will make another announcement once this is concluded.

Over at INN they quickly reported that the next in line for the seat is Sort Dragon, leader of the Darkness alliance.  Sort Dragon previously served on CSM10.

If Sort Dragon declines, next in line are Kalbuir Skirate of Pandemic Horde, followed by Killah Bee of Pandemic Legion, thus effectively keeping the seat both in the hands of a null sec representative and a member of the PanFam/NC/GotG coalition.  CCP will announce who will replace Vince Draken when they find somebody down the list who will take the job.

If none of those three take up the mantle, CCP will continue down the elimination trace.  The data they will use is available from the Dev Blog analyzing the CSM12 election results.

Empires of EVE in Audiobook Format

Empires of EVE started off back in 2014 as the Andrew Groen Kickstarter project to write a book about the null sec wars of EVE Online.

I was in as a backer, as were more than three thousand other people from the EVE Online community.

Two years later, the book was out and I had my nice hardback copy, which is currently sitting on the desk beside my keyboard.  The title, originally A History of the Great Empires of EVE Online, had been slimmed down to Empires of EVE, but the content was in no way trimmed.

How much more black could it be?

The book follows the formation of the first null sec corporations and alliances from the launch of the game in 2003 through what is called The Great War and the eventual downfall of the Band of Brothers alliance in 2009.

The book went out to the backers of the Kickstarter as well as going up for sale in both physical and ebook formats.  At last update, Andrew Groen has sold more than 12,000 copies of the book.  Not bad for a book about an obscure game with an odd name in a small segment of the video game market.

To promote the book Andrew Groen has given presentations at various gaming event, such as PAX.  If you get a chance to see one of his presentations, you should go.  He is an engaging speaking and remains enthusiastic on the topic.

So I was quite happy to hear that he had produced an audiobook version of the work and that he was the narrator.  It is available from Audible.com.

Audible.com is a subsidiary of Amazon

Having had an “any two titles” per month subscription with Audible.com since 2000, I put it in my queue and picked up a copy with my August titles and just finished listening to it.

It is not perfect.  Having seen Andrew Groen present about EVE Online and Empires of EVE, the book does not live up to that sort of experience.  This is not Andrew in front of an audience gushing about a topic in which he is invested, this is Andrew reading a book in a measured and even tone.  That was a minor disconnect for me, though I did get used to it quickly enough.  It just doesn’t seem like him.

Then there is pronunciation, something that plagues just about every audiobook.  How do you pronounce things in New Eden?  I remember during the Casino War being confused to find that CCP pronounces the region of Deklein as if it were the work “decline” and not “Deck-lynn” as I had always heard it pronounced.  In Andrew’s case, among other things, he pronounces the region Venal, which I always say as though it were the sin (which seems appropriate for null sec), as though it rhymes with the word “fennel.”

Also, hearing a written work read aloud tends to call attention to awkward phrasing and word repetition.  That is why it is an oft used self-editing technique.  At one point Andrew uses variations of the word “history” three times in a single sentence.  Reading that to yourself you might not notice it, but on hearing somebody say it aloud and it draws a cringe and an audible correction from me.  I talk back to my audiobooks in the car.

Then there is the recording itself, which is not optimal.  It was not recorded in a professional studio by my estimation, given the minor echo that runs throughout the book.

Finally, with the audiobook you do not get any of the maps of visuals included with the physical book.  The reason that my hardcover copy is next to me was that I pulled it out a couple of times to look at maps. (I also spent time at DOTLAN looking at regional maps.)

Still, these are not insurmountable issues.  And there is something very helpful or comforting about having somebody telling you about these events as opposed to reading the text off of a page.  The events wash over you and the threads and overall arc of the story become more important than whether or not a fight too place in the system C-J6MT.

I burned through the book in a few days, mostly while playing Minecraft or doing things in EVE Online like tend my PI farm, move ships, and rat.  The work is solid and enjoyable.

Furthermore, the work maybe be just the start.  Andrew Groen wrote in his update about the audiobook production of Empires of EVE that it was a learning process as much as anything with an eye towards being able to tell more such stories in the format.  So this may be the start of something.

Anyway, my gripes all summed up were minor while my enjoyment of the book in audio format was huge.  I recommend it, and I look forward to what might come next.

One Hundred and Eighty Million Skill Points

In which we explore the musical question, “Do I have enough skill points yet?”

The answer is clearly, “No!”  At least not yet, not in a world where there are more sub cap related skills to learn and where Asher comes up with new doctrines that are helped by having skills to level 5.

And so it goes.  I have two other characters on my main account who are starved for skill points… I threw a skill injector at one so he could at least run a cyno… while Wilhelm Arcturus, my main, continues to keep a training queue that is two years deep.

Anyway, the story of Wilhelm’s skill point progression so far.

And now he is at 180 million, seven months after the last post, right on schedule.

Actually, he hit 180 million about a week and a half ago.  But this is one of those posts that can sort of go as I have the time, so long as it still lands in the same month.  I had other things to write about over the last week or so, enough other things that I doubled up daily posts for a couple of days and I still have a few topics in the “catch up before it is too late” bin.

Anyway, this is my skill point distribution as of when I pulled the numbers for this post.  Categories that saw a change in skill points are marked with an asterisk.

 Spaceship Cmd 59,729,416 (59 of 75)*
 Gunnery 17,197,141 (36 of 46)
 Fleet Support 12,896,000 (14 of 15)
 Drones 11,704,870 (22 of 26)
 Missiles 11,059,167 (22 of 26)*
 Navigation 9,660,314 (13 of 13)
 Engineering 7,253,895 (15 of 15)
 Electronic Sys 7,189,415 (14 of 15)
 Armor 6,131,137 (13 of 13)
 Shields 5,994,039 (11 of 13)
 Science 5,462,151 (21 of 39)
 Resc Processing 4,569,908 (22 of 28)
 Trade 3,271,765 (9 of 14)
 Targeting 3,207,765 (8 of 8)
 Neural Enhance. 3,202,510 (7 of 8)
 Scanning 3,028,369 (7 of 7)*
 Subsystems 2,199,294 (16 of 16)*
 Planet Mgmt 1,612,315 (5 of 5)*
 Rigging 1,312,395 (10 of 10)
 Production 1,157,986 (5 of 12)
 Social 1,130,040 (5 of 9)
 Structure Mgmt 1,084,784 (2 of 6)
 Corp Mgmt 24,000 (2 of 5)

Total ~180,000,000 (338 of 428)

Of course, there is Spaceship Command up at the top still.  And, as usual, it saw the bulk of the new skill points show up, getting almost 8.5 million of the 10 million new skill points.

Probably the biggest addition there was training up to Command Ships V.  I can now fly a boosting ship like the Damnation and, with the right implant, provide the best possible fleet boosts.

A Dark Damnation

Of course, there is the question of how often I might do that.  I fit out a Damnation for the Reavers deployment to H-ADOC and flew it a few times there.  But then we got back home and the fit for main fleet is different and I had the Armor boosting implant and fleets seem to want the Information Warfare implant, so I either have to destroy an expensive implant to swap or manage clones carefully.

Clone management is easier with Citadels, if you have one handy that is set up for it, but I am also running out of extra clones to hold implant sets.  Asher has implants required for some doctrines, so I have a number of clones tied up with various implant sets already.  Life is complicated.  Poor me.

I also hit Interdictors V, just to have that handy, as well as Minmatar Strategic Cruiser V, because it sounded like the Loki might be the coming thing after the T3 revamp.  But I haven’t flown one yet.  I also tossed in Marauders due to a rumor that there might be such a doctrine, and Mining Frigate V, because it was a short train, picked up a couple of sub caps I couldn’t fly, and was at a time when I wasn’t burning to train something else.

After Spaceship Command I did invest a little time in Missiles.  With Defender Missiles becoming a thing after so many years, I trained those up a bit.  I also racked up a couple levels of specialization for missiles types, since we now fly a couple of missile doctrines.

Subsystems, the subsidiary skills for strategic cruisers, went up some despite the fact that CCP removed four of the skills, one from each empire, and refunded the skill points. (Which I put into Command Ships V, which took a few days off of that.)  However, with what seemed like enthusiasm for the Loki, I trained all the Minmatar subsystems to V and made sure I was at IV or V for all the skills for the Legion and the Proteus.   The net result was that the total skill points in subsystems went up.

I also trained up to Command Center Upgrades V under Planetary Management to give me enough power/CPU to run an extra extraction head on some of my planets, since there always seems to be an imbalance in the two resources I am harvesting.  Now the lower output resources gets an extra extractor.

And, finally, I started training up scanning.  My alt is all level V in scanning and I have gotten used to having that sort of ability handy, so now I want to duplicate it on my main.  This always happens, I get something on one and want it on the other.  I actually have a list of skills in my queue that I want to re-spec for, including scanning, once I am done with a couple more Spaceship Command skills.

Oddly, for the probably the first time in the history of these posts, I ended up with the same number of skills two posts in a row.  I had 338 skills last time and I have 338 skills this time.  Of course, that must mean that I trained four new skills as CCP took away four skills.

Anyway, this is how my skills shake out by level trained.

 Level 1 - 1
 Level 2 - 7
 Level 3 - 42
 Level 4 - 98
 Level 5 - 190

190 skills at level V puts me up 8, while 98 at level IV is an increase of 17 skills at that level.  I rounded up a few level II and III skills it seems since last time.

And speaking of last time, at the one hundred and seventy million mark I noted that I was in danger finishing up my benchmark metric of being able to fly all of the sub caps.  Last time I only had the Endurance and Prospect mining frigates, the Occator and Viator Amarr transport ships, the Loki strategic cruiser, and Marauders.  I can fly all of those now, which I think means I can fly all the sub caps.

Everything else on the Spaceship Command list is related to capital ships.  I suppose I could fantasize about flying all the capitals, but that seems a bit silly… and expensive.  Training up the Jump Freighter skill might be useful, since I have Caldari Freighter trained up already as well as the Navigation skills related to capitals.  That would give me the Rhea.

Maybe Spaceship Command will stop growing so much every time.  After I get the two remaining strategic cruisers to V, what else will I need.  Marauders IV maybe.  But after that, do I really need, for example, Black Ops V?

I suppose we’ll see when I hit 190 million skill points, which ought to come around some time in March of 2018.  And if you’re just dying to see what skills I have trained, you can see them all here.

Adding Up a Year of Pokemon Go

I was a bit late to the party.  While Pokemon Go kicked off in July of last year, I did not jump on the bandwagon until a month later.

It wasn’t so much a matter of not wanting to join the rush on day one… even if that meant experiencing all the day one issues… as it was the lack of a device.  I only joined the smart phone set in August of last year, having held onto my LG “it’s just a phone” for long past its expected life span.

But while I was late to join, I have hung in with the game longer than most, judging by the numbers.

My sticking with Pokemon Go has likely been for a few reasons.

First, I do love me some Pokemon, so I am definitely in the target audience.  Being able to go outside into the real world and catch Pokemon… or sit on the couch and do so, since they show up in our neighborhood… was an immediate draw.  It isn’t quite like the core RPG games, but it is close enough.

Second, like a lot of phone games, it is pretty low impact.  I do not spend hours a day playing.  If I have a free moment I might pull out my phone to see

Third, it probably helps that I live in a pretty target rich environment when it comes to Pokestops and gyms.  The campus I work on has five Pokestops and a gym along a half kilometer circuit that I walk during the day.  There are two parks near our house with Pokestops and gyms as well.

Fourth, the change that added the daily bonus for catching and getting a Pokestop sped up the leveling process just as I was hitting the steep slope in the game, taking the edge off of that.

Fifth, the change to gyms and how you earn coins has also boosted my activity.  I challenge a lot more gyms and earn a lot more coins these days.  In fact, I earn so many more in a week compared to the old gym style, that I wonder if Niantic has erred on the side of generosity.  I went from maybe 10 coins a week to 100-200 a week, even with the 50 coin daily cap.  Of course, having something of a captive gym at the office that I can hold for a day a couple times a week might make me something of an outlier.  Some times I want people to take it from me so I can collect the coins and start again.

Sixth, the game keeps all sorts of statistics, and I love me some useless stats!  I’ll get to those below.

And finally, my wife still plays as well, so it is something we talk about and do together, much to the annoyance of my daughter.

Of course, not all is sweetness and light in the land of Pokemon Go.  A year down the road I do have some gripes.

The game still sucks battery life like no other.  When out and active, it sucks down at least 2% of your battery every minute pretty reliably.

The game does not reliably count steps/distance walked unless it is up and active.  I can’t just walk, I have to have the game up and going and in my hand.  At least you can set it to black the screen out if you invert the phone, which reduces battery usage a little.

The variety of Pokemon in any given area is pretty limited.  I was all excited when we went to visit my aunt one day and discovered her location was a hotbed of Magikarp.  Unfortunately, we were visiting her to help her move, so I have no reason to visit there again, and it is an hour’s drive, so I am not wandering up there just for Pokemon.

Earning candies to evolve Pokemon that do not spawn in your area is a big pain.  I have only managed to evolve one of the three initial starter Pokemon to its final form.  And I am still 135 candies away from evolving a Magikarp into a Gyrados.

The candy mechanic in general doesn’t jibe with the core Pokemon RPG expectation that you just need to catch one rare and then you can train it up.  You need to catch many rares in order to evolve and train up your Pokemon.  But if they’re rare, you won’t be catching very many.

5km eggs are just shit.  Nothing new has ever hatched from one for me.  When I have a bag full of 5km eggs it is demotivating.  A 2km or a 10km egg will get me to walk extra laps at the office.

As much as I like the new gyms, and even the mechanics for catching the raid Pokemon, actually defeating and catching anything rare requires more people to show up than I have ever seen.  If my wife and I cannot take a gym raid down, it just isn’t going to happen.

No trading, no playing against friends (or spouses).

I still can’t reliably beat a CP 2800+ Blissey.  If I see one in a gym, I just keep walking.  And, of course, I am jealous that *I* don’t have one.

Anyway, a year has gone by, the game has mostly evolved for the better, and I still enjoy playing, so I will likely keep going for now.

Statistics

After a year of playing, this is where I stand.

  • Level – 29
  • Total XP – 1,791,678
  • XP to hit Level 30 – 208,322
  • Pokedex – 186 unique caught
  • Pokedex – 219 unique seen
  • Kanto Pokedex – 126 caught
  • Johto Pokedex – 60 caught
  • Total Pokemon caught – 3,389
  • Most often caught – Pidgey, 485 times
  • Highest CP Pokemon – Vaporeon, CP 2574
  • Total Pokemon evolved – 429
  • Pokestops visited – 3,053
  • Distance walked (with the app open) – 358.5km
  • Eggs hatched – 152
  • Gym Battles won – 237
  • Hours of Gym Defense – 352
  • Berries fed at Gyms – 74
  • Trained at Gym – 26
  • Gym Raids won – 3
  • Pikachu caught – 56

Types caught

These are the types of Pokemon I have caught, types being the key to the rock/paper/scissors aspect of Pokemon battles.

Pokemon can be of two mixed types, so if I catch a Hoothoot, I get credit for both a Normal and a Flying type.  As such, the numbers below add up to more than the total Pokemon caught/hatched listed above.

  • Normal Type caught – 1,740
  • Flying Type caught – 1,128
  • Poison Type caught – 699
  • Bug Type caught – 510
  • Water Type caught – 411
  • Grass Type caught – 292
  • Fire Type caught – 219
  • Ground Type caught – 196
  • Psychic Type caught – 172
  • Electric Type caught – 117
  • Fighting Type caught – 103
  • Fairy Type caught – 90
  • Dark Type caught – 71
  • Rock Type caught – 66
  • Steel Type caught – 26
  • Ghost Type caught – 20
  • Ice Type caught – 16
  • Dragon Type caught – 2

The two dragon type were a pair of Dratini I caught as a passenger driving through Oakland when we were stuck in traffic near the Bay Bridge.  As with the Magikarp, another situation I am unlikely to find myself in any time soon.

So that is the game a year in.

The August 2017 EVE Online Update brings the Lucky Clash Event

We are getting an August update this year, which I found a bit surprising.   And they even kept the naming consistent for three months running.  If they hit four that might be a record.   Anyway, lots of people at CCP are generally on vacation during July and August, so the month has been skipped at times for lack of content to deliver.

Not this August though, this August we’re getting some… stuff… I think… even if it was delayed a day.

We got a new event.  As a follow on to The Agency event, we got the Lucky Clash event starting today.

I want to say Lucky Cash… or LSMFT

This event pits the Independent Gaming Commission against some pirates known as the Redtail Sharks, and the IGC needs your help fighting them off.  So from now through August 23rd you can join help defend the various IGC gambling dens around New Eden from the Redtail Sharks.

So now we’re defending casinos again?  I wonder if that was accidental or deliberate irony.

Anyway, check your overview… and then go fix the settings… to find a site to defend near you.

After that, well, CCP giveth, and CCP taketh away.  The other big item in the August update, as CCP announced last month, is the removal of the Captain’s Quarters from stations in New Eden.

Me in the Captain’s Quarters back in 2011… the last time I used them

The source of much of the Incarna drama, the captain’s quarters were too much or not enough of something, depending upon whom was speaking.  In the end, walking in stations ended with the rejection of the Incarna release and the Captain’s Quarters have been mostly lingering ever since.

No, six years later, they are being removed from the game.  CCP posted a dev blog as to why they were doing this, but the upshot is that the code takes dev time to maintain and it is standing in the way of a 64-bit client.

As somebody who went through three Fortizar fights in the last week or so, each of which would have been made better by having a 64-bit client… unless you turn down graphics the current client is likely to access all the memory it can and then crash… I applaud this decision.  We’ve had 64-bit processors and 64-bit operating systems for a decade now, time to move the client forward.

I know, somewhere, somebody is really mourning the passing of the Captain’s Quarters.  One of my iron laws of MMORPGs is that any feature, no matter how bad, tangential, or useless, is somebody’s absolute favorite feature, and you’ll find out who the moment you remove it.  Sorry you have to take one for the team, but dealing with what tends to be called the “technical debt” of old features is painful, and sometimes you have to drop a feature to move forward.

And so it goes.

After that the August release is just fixes and adjustments to things already in the game.

There were some tweaks to how citadel launched void bombs work:

  • Reduce the rate of fire of the Structure Guided Bomb Launcher from 20 seconds to 40 seconds
  • Reduce the area of effect of Guided Void Bombs from 40km to 20km
  • Reduce the neut amount per second of the Guided Void Bomb by 25% (6000GJ every 40 seconds as opposed to the previous 4000Gj every 20s)
  • Reduce the velocity of the Guided Void Bomb by 20% (increasing flight time to keep the range the same)

That, however, is not going to be enough to change the structure shooting meta.  You will still have to attack them with a fleet doctrine that can shoot when neuted out, so armor tanked Typhoons or Machariels or Hurricanes supported by cap-chaining Guardians will still likely be the only options against slower shooting, but harder hitting, void bombs.

Meanwhile, deploying Upwell Structures has been made a bit easier, and using them has been made more attractive as some of the bonuses for the soon-to-be-removed player-owned starbases have been removed.  Industry and reprocessing bonuses are gone.

There were also updated for the standings, scanning, and beta map as covered by a recent dev blog.

The beta map is another one of those features that makes my head hurt.  One of my long standing gripes about EVE Online has been that the in-game map isn’t very useful.

It is pretty, and hella impressive to show your non-playing friends, but it just isn’t very practical as an in-game tool.  And I say that even today, with the current map, which is a vast improvement over the state of the map back when I started playing EVE.

Seriously, I went to DOTLAN yesterday and got a database error when I tried to look up a system and my heart about stopped.  The idea of not having that out-of-game map resource, and being stuck with the in-game map, was painful to even consider.

And then came the beta map, the plan for which seemed to me to be “let’s make something prettier and more impressive to look at, but even less practical to actually use.”  And so the new map has lingered as the beta map for a few years now, because it was clearly a step back from the already impractical in-game map in terms of usefulness.

But CCP seems to have decided to get back to work on the long neglected beta map.  The list of changes is long and impressive.  Somebody spent some time on the project recently.  But is that enough to make the beta map useful?

There are a pile of other small fixes that have gone into the August update.  Details are available via the Patch Notes and the Updates page.

The update has been reported as successfully deployed, so it is all there waiting for us.

Still no music though.  I guess the days of a new song with every update are over.

 

Blogger Fantasy Movie League – Week Eleven

When things start falling apart.

The edge was clearly coming off the contest.  Not only was Liore so far out in front as to be unassailable, but even in the pack changes in overall standings seemed unlikely.  Add in a week with no blockbuster launches and it was no wonder that two people forgot to even make their picks for the week.

Yes, there were a few new movies this past weekend, but when you have been through weeks with 50, 70, and even 100 million dollar openings, the opening of Annabelle: Creation, predicted to be in the $25 million range isn’t exactly stirring.  Plus I knew nothing about the film.  Still, I had a $1,000 budget and eight screens to fill, so I went down the list trying to make a stab at some sort of line up.

 Annabelle Creation $380
 The Nut Job 2      $176
 Dunkirk            $143
 The Dark Tower     $106
 Girls Trip         $89
 The Emoji Movie    $77
 Spider-Man         $75
 Kidnap             $72
 Detroit            $56
 Atomic Blonde      $54
 The Glass Castle   $52
 Despicable Me 3    $44
 Planet of the Apes $43
 Baby Driver        $21
 Wonder Woman       $20

In the end, for no good reason, I decided an all female leads theme was the way to go, so I went with two screens of Annabelle Creation, a screen of Kidnap, two screens of Atomic Blonde, and three screens of Wonder Woman.

As the weekend estimates came in, it looked like Liore was going to win another week.  She only went with one screen of Annabelle Creation, but she had three screens of The Glass Castle, which looked likely to get the best price/performance boost of $2 million per screen, enough to boost Liore ahead of the pack yet again.

And then the final numbers came in and Annabelle Creation, which beat estimates by $10 million, ended up being the best price/performance pick of the week, bolstering my selection and pushing Liore down into third place for the week, behind myself and Ocho.

My Week 11 Picks and their Revenue

I won the week, the rankings shaking out as:

  1. Wilhelm’s Clockwork Lemon Multiplex – $92,413,326
  2. Ocho’s Octoplex – $91,063,841
  3. Dr Liore’s Evil House of Pancakes – $85,743,232
  4. Braxwolf’s Waffleplex – $77,611,192
  5. Void’s Awesomeplex – $75,807,974
  6. Pasduil’s Popcorn Picturehouse – $74,817,084
  7. Moderate Peril’s Sleazy Porno Theatre – $74,252,899
  8. Syl’s Fantasy Galore Panopticum – $66,138,438
  9. Bel’s House of Horrors – $26,866,850
  10. Murf’s Matinee Mania – $14,924,605

Bel and Murf both failed to pick, so rolled with the previous weeks picks, which left them each with two empty screens as some of their picks were no longer on the list.

Nobody in our league got the perfect pick of the week, which consisted of two screens of Annabelle Creation, three screens of the Glass Castle, a screen of Planet of the Apes, and two screens of Wonder Woman.  261 people managed to get the perfect pick overall on the site, which netted them $99,547,100.

Perfect Picks for Week 11

As noted, there isn’t much that can be done at this point to shake up the rankings, save forgetting to pick for a couple of week.  At the end of week 11 the overall seasonal rankings looked like this:

  1. Dr Liore’s Evil House of Pancakes – $1,179,773,786
  2. Wilhelm’s Clockwork Lemon Multiplex – $1,099,976,348
  3. Ocho’s Octoplex – $1,015,911,862
  4. Void’s Awesomeplex – $983,919,075
  5. Moderate Peril’s Sleazy Porno Theatre – $959,423,735
  6. Pasduil’s Popcorn Picturehouse – $944,970,871
  7. Braxwolf’s Waffleplex – $926,427,978
  8. Syl’s Fantasy Galore Panopticum – $853,353,980
  9. Murf’s Matinee Mania – $833,121,646
  10. Bel’s House of Horrors – $799,170,850

The only change in ranking was Syl climbing up another spot after Murf failed to do his picks.

Beating Liore by about $7 million this week still leaves me $80 million behind.  That is way too much ground to cover with only two weeks remaining, and all the more so when one looks at the week 12 line up.

Hitman's Bodyguard $254
Annabelle Creation $216
Logan Lucky        $184
Dunkirk            $98
The Nut Job 2      $62
Spiderman          $58
The Emoji Movie    $52
Girls Trip         $50
The Glass Castle   $48
The Dark Tower     $48
Wind River         $43
Kidnap             $38
Atomic Blonde      $34
Planet of the Apes $29
Despicable Me 3    $28

On the bright side, I suppose, there are no $5 titles on the list.  However, there also isn’t a single title ranked over $300 either, making it look like a pretty thin week.  I’ll be lucky to get $80 million out of these picks, much less close the gap between Liore and myself.

So there we stand with two weeks left to go in the season.

Delve – Still Ratting, Still Mining, Still Manufacturing

The New Eden monthly economic report for July 2017 is out, a little later than usual, but better late than never.

Getting straight to the ISK sinks and faucets chart, it does look like the changes in June update regarding super carrier ratting have continued to hold, as total bounties remain on a downward slope.

July 2017 – Top Sinks and Faucets over time

That still seems like a lot of ISK from bounties, even if the trend is downward for the moment.  CCP made no further adjustments in the July update, and tomorrow’s planned update does not mention anything in that regard in the patch notes.

However, while the overall amount from bounties is down, in Delve they are actually up some, topping the July number by about 400 billion ISK.

July 2017 – NPC Bounties by Region

That is still down from the May peak, when the number was 8.8 trillion ISK in bounties.  But the bulk of the reduction in the bounty pay outs seems to be coming from other regions in New Eden.

Likewise, the care bear reputation of Delve is reinforced by the mining output for the region.

July 2017 – Mining Value by Region

That chart shows the value of mining in Delve up from 8.5 trillion ISK in June to 10.2 trillion ISK in July.  Of course, those values are influence by the market value of the output, so if actual ore mined was the same, but prices rose, that output value would rise as well.  I don’t watch the mineral and ore markets, so couldn’t tell you if actual amount mined was up or if prices are rising some.

And then there was production, which was up considerably since June, no doubt consuming all that mining output and then some.

July 2017 – Production Value by Region

Delve became the number one manufacturing region in New Eden, edging out The Forge by about a trillion ISK in value.  Though, if you add up the regions close to Jita, The Forge, The Citadel, and Lonetrek, high sec manufacturing for the Jita market is still dominant.

Looking at the key economic indicators chart, you can see that Delve still imports a lot, most of it from Jita, while the exports are negligible.

July 2017 – Key Regional Stats Compared

So I suppose I can be all “Yay Delve!  We’re #1” and such.

However, since the beginning of August the Imperium has taken its show on the road, landing in Hakonen in the Lonetrek region, where we seem determined to anchor a Fortizar no matter how many attempts it takes.

With all the combat pilots moving north, those left behind hoping to rat and mine in peace have been in for a rude awakening, with Rorquals and carriers going down in flames to roving gangs.  The Delve defense system has been denuded and losses have been mounting.

So the question will be how much of an impact will this have on the Delve ratting and mining numbers?  Will Delve top the charts for player ship losses come the August report? Tune in next month to see what sort of change is in store.