June in Review

The Site

Well, WordPress.com finally decided to impose their new stats page on us.  I am not a fan, to say the least.  While they did fix the problem where the first three years of my stats were missing, which I complained about previously, the format leaves me cold.  They have added a few more informational tidbits to the mix:

That is 18:00 UTC, probably when Bhagpuss gets home from work

That is 18:00 UTC, probably about when Bhagpuss gets home from work

But they have removed all the summary charts that I really, really like.  Fortunately, for the time being, you can still access the previous version of the stats page at the URL:

https://wordpress.com/my-stats/

You can also find the even older version of the stats page for your WordPress.com blog if you modify this URL to add in your blog’s domain:

https:// <blog name e.g. tagn> .wordpress.com/wp-admin/index.php?page=stats

You do have to log in and have permissions for any given blog, so you cannot modify that URL to see the stats of others.

Meanwhile, WordPress.com and Automattic, its parent company, are coming up on their 10th anniversary in August of letting people in to blog for free.  It seems odd that I have been around and blogging on WordPress.com for almost 9 of those 10 years.

One Year Ago

I toasted the Newbie Blogger Initiative class of 2014.  Long may they post.

WildStar launched… and started its journey to F2P.  Still alive though.

SOE finally broke its ties with the ill-fated and ill-conceived ProSiebenSat.1 deal.

Derek Smart was telling us why to charge for beta.  Lord British was getting serious with virtual real estate.

It was summer and the short lived strategy group was looking to the Steam Summer Sale for a new game.  Meanwhile we were still playing our epic game of Civilization V.

We heard about how CCP handled/mishandled World of Darkness.

CCP launched the last of its expansions with a six month lead-time.  Kronos was the end of the line for twice yearly expansions.  I set off on the training plan to be a wing/fleet booster in EVE Online.

In Azereoth, my attempt at the Loremaster achievement had me in Darkshore and then on to Ashenvale and the Stonetalon Mountains .

Meanwhile the Warlords of Draenor alpha was starting, so I had to avert my eyes.  So I started pondering things like how Blizzard should change the starter edition of WoW.

The instance group, heading towards its regular summer hiatus, was hitting the Mogu-shan Palace.

I took a look at a long history of gear obsession.

And I was wondering if authenticators were still a thing.

Five Years Ago

Warhammer Online, whose game tips I previously mocked, was out soliciting user written game tips with the most boring video game related video ever.  Really, I was embarrassed for them.

Meanwhile, there were comical tips to be found in another game.

CCP was telling people that the steep learning curve in EVE Online was just part of the game, and Hulkageddon III was on the way.

FrontierVille came along, evoking the whole Oregon Trail thing… for which they recently were sued.  And a good thing to, as they are a bunch of lying bastards there at Zynga.  They never sent me my FarmVille magnet.

There was the big news from Turbine with Lord of the Rings Online going Free to Play.  I wondered is Lifetime Subscribers like myself would get the shaft in this transition.  But Turbine made me a perm VIP instead and put out one of those charts that seems to accompany these multi-level subscription scams structures.  But I was winning LOTRO lotteries, so I was happy for the moment.

In Pokemon SoulSilver I had beat all the gym leaders, but we were having Pokewalker problems.

Then there was Blizzard.  Where to start?  They were to the Summer of 2010 what CCP is becoming to the Summer of 2011.

They were selling WoW Gold straight from the main page.  Really.  It just isn’t what you think.

They screwed up the parental controls interface… in my opinion… along with compromising the security of it.

The whole RealID thing was just getting warmed up.

One of the accounts in our guild was compromised and the guild bank was looted.  That has happened a couple times since and is barely news any more.

And during all this, the instance group was working its way through The Burning Crusade content with our Horde alts, but we weren’t really feeling it.

Ennui had set in and our only hope was Cataclysm.  And there were plenty of offers to get us into the beta.

New Linking Sites

The following blogs have linked this site in their blogrolls, for which they have my thanks.

Please take a moment to visit them in return.

Most Viewed Posts in June

  1. Fine, You Can Fly in Draenor, But Only AFTER You Hit an Arbitrary Content Threshold!
  2. Alamo teechs u 2 play DURID!
  3. The Search for the Summer Game
  4. Introducing Carnyx the Magnificent
  5. Entosis Link Modules in Action in Querious
  6. Travel Advisory – Conflict in Amarr
  7. Quote of the Day – F2P Insight
  8. Play On: Guild Name Generator
  9. What Future for Turbine after Infinite Crisis?
  10. The Revenant Kill in JU-0WQ
  11. A Bit of Ancient History that Still Sticks With Me…
  12. On to 64-Bit Gaming

Search Terms of the Month

civ iii on win 7 64 bi compuer
[That isn’t the hardware info I need to help you]

aggronauts myspace
[I’m pretty sure Belghast gave up on MySpace]

is turbine developing a new mmo?
[If they are, they haven’t shared it with me]

totally free and legit courses online
[Good luck with that]

why does server emulation take so long to do
[It probably takes less time than the original]

Spam Comment of the Month

So, sum up the advantages of belonging to the pre-war, animal husbandry, which is the top 30% inhibition, can play a little more aggressive, make good use of the hammer then fear storm control, and no brain start to play shield + disperse oppressive force play. Danelaw went to the former and Wessex to the latter with each side taking half of Mercia.
* Fast Poison.

EVE Online

After the Reavers left Querious things slowed down a bit for me in New Eden.  We ran a couple of ops to Fountain to assist Brave Newbies, making us the rare exception to the “let’s go to Fountain and farm!” trend.  And there was Burn Amarr.  But the last week or so has been more about settling in and finding a home in Tribute.

EverQuest

I have probably been playing this for some definitions of “playing,” but even so I have not made much progress.  I made a few characters to claim the storage box that was given to those who joined the beta, which gave me a pile of alts to work on.  So now I have a pile of low level alts.  None of them are even level 10 yet.  It is just like 1999 again.

EverQuest II

I have been keeping an eye on EverQuest II because of the plans for their own nostalgia server.  I am interested to see how this will turn out.  I suspect it will be successful for reasons different than the EverQuest side of the house.

Minecraft

Since Father’s Day I have put in quite a few hours in the low-res world of Minecraft.  It certainly has a charm of its own, even if I am a few years late to the party.  But then, that just means that they have fixed all the bugs by now, right?

War Thunder

I have been putting in a bit of time with War Thunder over the last month.  I am still horrendously bad at it.  If I was better I might spend some money on it.  But I have a whole post on that and how the usual trend in F2P is manifesting itself in the game.

World of Warcraft

This has been in something like maintenance mode for most of the month.  I log in to tend my garrison.  I totally fail to show up for group nights.  I don’t do much else.  Then came the 6.2 patch last week.  Well, I am sure I will have a post about that.  I am just not sure what to say at this point.

Coming Up

July is the start of the summer silly season, when news dries up and we all start fixating on things like prognosticating octopi and the like.  Then we’ll head into August, the barren wasteland of new content and game launches, where memes and questionnaires will be all to sustain us as we entertain bizarro world ideas, like turning Pong into an MMO or imagining Star Citizen delivering on all its promises or taking crazy ravings on the internet seriously.  I will no doubt be digging deep into my drafts folder looking for something to write about then.

It is enough to make a body want to just take the summer off.

Still, there are a couple of things on the horizon.  Daybreak will be doing whatever it is they plan to do with EverQuest II and their nostalgia server.  There is supposed to be a beta starting as soon as the week of July 7th.

CCP has another expansion coming up on July 7th, to be followed a week later with the final transition to Fozzie Sov, at which point we’ll get to see first hand just how many loopholes and exploits there are in the plan.  I expect at least two sov holding alliances to fail cascade in simple frustration at dealing with the mechanics.  Could be interesting times, and doubly so since SniggWaffe (Pandemic Legion Junior) and some pals look like they came along and kicked J4LP out of half of Cloud Ring, so we’ll have them on our doorstep.  That should make for some excitement.

What else is coming up in July?

Further Exploration in Minecraft

After the Father’s Day round of Minecraft my daughter seemed to think we were done with it.  Or that I was done with it.  So she was surprised to find that I launched the server again over the next few days and was interested in further exploration.

Despite the fact that she likes to play on servers with mods, she agreed to come play with me some more, picking up where she left off on building us a what she considered a proper house.

A house on the hill

A house on the hill

My job was to gather sand and melt it into blocks of glass in the furnace so that we would have lots of windows.  It is two stories with a room for each of us.  Each room also featured a skylight… more glass blocks… which was neat when it started to rain.

Rain at the house

Rain at the house

She built the house on a hill not too far from our farm, so the beacon she built to help us navigate the area would still be useful for getting home.

The farm, lit up at night

The farm, lit up at night

I eventually built a raised road between the house and the farm just to make it easier to travel between the two.  That is one thing about Minecraft is that you can sit around and make minor updates and adjustments and additions all you want.  I eventually built that road, expanded the lot around the house, built a wall with several gates to keep the monsters out, and planted a pumpkin patch around back just because.

All of that happened later though, because my daughter was insisting on something of a whirlwind tour of the game, which started out with horses.

She spotted some horses not too far from our home so we headed out there to tame a couple which involves getting on the horse until it gives up and stops knocking you off.

Mounted on horses

Mounted on horses

She had also found a village near by and was able to trade for saddles, which are apparently also part of the whole horse thing.  This went by pretty quickly so I wasn’t sure how she even got the saddles and was mildly surprised that villages of NPCs were actually a thing.  But there they were.

The village

The village

When we got back to the house with the horses it was already night fall, so we boarded them downstairs and went to bed.

Horse in the living room, not recommended

Horse in the living room, not recommended

The next morning we build a stable adjacent to the house for the horses.

Then my daughter wanted to go mining.  We needed iron for some of the things she wanted to do, so it was down and down underground until we picked up enough of that to build a set of armor for each of us.  That probably explains why I haven’t died yet.

We also came across some diamonds as well, so were able to craft some high quality weapons and tools.

Armored up with a diamond shovel

Armored up with a diamond shovel

We needed the diamond tools… or at least the diamond pick… in order to harvest some special materials for her next item on the list, a portal to the nether.

The portal looms

The portal looms

That built, we jumped in and took a quick visit to the nether, though we had to stop for a minute and watch the video Screw the Nether on YouTube which, up to that point, constituted my total knowledge of the nether.

In the nether for a bit

In the nether for a bit

Our trip there was short.  We took a quick look around, harvested something, and then headed back to the portal.  The portal in the nether somehow ended up surrounded in flames and I caught fire and nearly died getting back.  After that she walled up the portal lest anything venture from it.  We still have it close by should we need it.

And that was it for the whirlwind tour.  She went back to other servers and I was left to potter about.

As noted, I spent some time improving the house.  I also delved into the mines below us, harvesting materials, boring out new galleries to work, and occasionally falling into a deep hole which then necessitated digging myself back to the surface again.  The land around our house started to look like it had been set upon by a pack of rather large gophers.  There were holes all over.  So I spent some time marking those, putting up walls and torches to keep myself from falling in.

That lasted for a while, but eventually I got the urge to explore.  I decided to keep it simple and just headed south in a straight line in hopes of not getting lost.  That worked for a while.  There were, of course, things in the way.  I bored out a tunnel at one point and had to pave over yet another hole in the ground to keep the path straight.  And I would drop a cobblestone block and put a torch on top of it every so often in order to mark my way.

Exploring turns out to be pretty neat.  There is definitely a hard limit on how far one can travel in a day and terrain can limit your progress drastically.  I decided to bore through a hill and ended up breaking out at the top of a sheer cliff at one point, so had to go back a stair step my way down.

And then night falls and you have to hole up and make a shelter.  I was smart enough to pack supplies, the key item being a bed.  You dig yourself a shelter, secure it, put down your bed and sleep through the night.  Then, when you wake it is day time again and you can pick up the bed and move on.

I kept on heading south for a few days, then ran into a wide body of water.  It was getting on in the day so I built a more elaborate shelter than normal, lit it up, and even put a door on it.  Then I built something like a dock on the water and called it a night.  The next day I built a boat, my first, and sailed off to explore the lake.

And promptly got lost.

Then started my adventures in the wilderness.  I never got back to my dock or shelter on the boat.  I ended up way off in a jungle area and tried to make my way back in the direction of home.  I remembered to pack some wool, so I could make another bed, but otherwise had to find materials along the way to replace my tools as they wore out.

Eventually, channeled off course by a series of steep valleys, I was way out in the boonies and had no idea which way home might lay.  I had passed through jungles and wooded areas and a high plateau with snow, and eventually down into some more wooded valleys.  That could have been close to home or it could have been further away.  I had no idea.

In going through the recipe list I saw that, among the things you would make, was a map.   So I set up a camp on a river and started farming some sugar can, which can be turned into paper, along with some watermelons for food.  I build a shelter, tended my farm, and then started mining for the necessary additional materials.

Days went by.  I built a spire on top of a nearby mountain and lit it with torches as a marker so I could find my way back as I explored around the area.  I eventually had paper, but was still missing other ingredients.

My daughter came in to see what I was up to and I told her I went exploring and she said, “Alone!?!?!” and told me I should only go exploring in a group.  I was totally lost but had no idea how far from home I was, so she logged in and made some fireworks to set off to see if I could see them

Eventually I gave her admin powers and she summoned me to the spawn point, which she moved near our home.  My first action was to make a compass, as I had the materials in a chest in our house.  That always points to the spawn point so now I at least know what direction home is going forward.

Then I kind of missed the little base I had built up while lost and tried to find it again.  I made it south and found my dock and the stuff I had left behind, but sailing out on a boat again I couldn’t find where I had eventually come ashore.  I am kind of sorry I let her summon me home, as I feel like I left something undone out there.  So I will carry on trying to find my old base, building new ones as I explore.

But I could see this as a potential group game, setting up a base and improving it while exploring and taming the world around it.

Anyway, our home abides and there is more to explore.

Home at sunset

Home at sunset

Postcards from Burn Amarr

Burn Amarr is over and the accounting is in.  You can find final tallies and conclusions at TMC and EN24.  As happens in all such events, everybody picks their point of view and spins the data to prove somebody won and somebody lost.  Everybody claimed they won during the first Burn Jita, why should this be any different?

I think the main difference is that the shock of the first event has passed.  The first Burn Jita was covered by the international press.  It was new and different.  My video from the undock on the first night has more than 140,000 views, putting it about 138,500 views ahead of my next most popular video.

But now, in the wake of three Burn Jita events, Burn Amarr wasn’t anything new.  There was the roleplay aspect of it, which got CVA up out of Providence to participate in the defense of the Empress Jamyl Sarum.

But taking the circus of destruction out of the big city and letting it play out in a second tier trade hub… Amarr at its peak is about the same as Jita on a very slow day… on top of it being the fourth year running, made for a less spectacular event.  Only 360 billion… or 440 billion… ISK in freighters and industrial command ships were destroyed in and around Amarr.  That is less than any of the Burn Jita events, which all exceeded 500 billion ISK.

Still, exchanging 32 billion is losses (over 11,000 individual ships, mostly in the form of the Gallente Catalyst destroyer, the backbone of the gank fleets) for even 360 billion ISK in kills is hard to paint as a “complete failure” as some have claimed.

Many Catalysts died to bring you this event

Many Catalysts died to bring you this event

So content was created, forces on both sides of the even had their moments, but there won’t be any headlines in the mainstream press about the alleged real world value of this virtual spaceship destruction.

My own participation was pretty small.  I decided that this year I was going to fly in the gank fleet a few times to see what it was like.  My security status dropped, I got on a few kills, but I saw some pretty amazing sites.  And I got a few screen shots to share.

 

A Flirtation with The Sims

After about a week of pondering, my daughter came to me and told me which game she wanted to play instead of World of Warcraft.  The choice of a summer game was at hand.

Then she said, “The Sims!” and I went, “Huh?”

Specifically, she had decided on The Sims 4 based on something she read somewhere on the internet.

Just in case you need a picture

Just in case you need a picture

I had to ask if she was doing this because she read something about murdering Sims by trapping them in basements or pools or doors without rooms and, if that was her plan, could I watch.  That did not appear to be her plan at all, but her response made it clear that these were things worth looking into.  A proud parenting moment, where the values of one generation are transmitted to the next.

To my somewhat mild surprise, The Sims 4… and the evil of Origin that is required to play it… were both available for Mac OS.  I didn’t think EA still did anything on Apple products, aside from horrible iOS apps that you have to pay for up front and which then still show you ads.

And, as it turned out, The Sims 4 had been marked down from its original list price to something approximately equal to the three month World of Warcraft subscription, which made the math easy.  I told her she would be giving up WoW for at least three months and using that subscription money to buy The Sims 4.

She was fine with that, so off we went.

First I had to create an Origin account, which proved to be awkward.  EA has apparently somehow come into contact with every single email address I have ever used and had set aside a pre-made account for each.  Seriously, a couple old addresses I hadn’t used in years came up with, “You cannot create a new account with that address because we have already absorbed it into the Origin Collective! One of us! One of us!”

Not creepy at all EA.  I know you’ve tried to meld everything into your evil plan.  I’ve run across these account merges before.  But seriously, I had never before downloaded the Origin software or specifically created an Origin account.  It might be nice to at least make me think this was my idea or something.

Eventually I picked an email address, went through some password reset hoops, downloaded the software to the iMac, and had everything setup short of entering my credit card information.  At that point I asked my daughter one last time if she was sure.

She was sure.

So the deed was done.  The Sims 4 was purchased and downloaded and she began to play.

And play she did.  I have to admit she threw herself into The Sims 4 and played it to death.  She would have taken all her meals at her computer and stayed up all night playing if she had been allowed.  That went on for three days when she suddenly approached me and told me that she absolutely NEEDED to get the Get to Work expansion for the game.

Best expansion name ever

Best expansion name ever

I explained that she had used up the house gaming subsidy for the quarter, which only covers a video game subscription to WoW or other MMO or the cash equivalent.  She understood that and was prepared to spend her own money for this expansion, which ran $30.

I made her hand me the money before I would even get out the credit card.  This made my wife roll her eyes, but I wanted to be very solid on the fact that she was paying for this… plus I am bad at debt collection, so I want cash on the barrel head.

So the cash was forked over and the expansion purchased.

She immediately went to town on that for another day or so.  At one point I came over and found her designing the most efficient eight person sweatshop possible, a veritable North Korean work camp without the political indoctrination, and wondering how long the workers would survive.  A true child of Silicon Valley, where we are all big on fair trade coffee and work/life balance until we’re put in charge and every expense comes out of the bottom line.

The next day I came home from work and she said she had to reboot the iMac for an update and needed me to log back into Origin for her.  I said I would be over in a bit, but she didn’t seem in a hurry.  When I put my stuff down and wandered over to see what she was up to, she was playing Minecraft on some PvP server and didn’t really want to pause.  I came by a couple more times that evening, but something else was always going on, Minecraft or drawing or looking at cat .gifs on Imgur.

Days passed and I kept offering to log her in.  Eventually I checked while she was away and saw that Origin had actually been logged in the whole time. (Don’t remember telling it to do that, but you know, EA.)  So I asked her why she stopped playing.

She said the Get to Work expansion had been a disappointment and did not really open up the game the way she thought it would from the description.  The base game was still okay and she liked some of the creative aspects of it, but the lack of an open world limited the game’s appeal over time.  Having read some follow-up items on the web, she felt that she might have been better off with The Sims 3.

There was clearly some buyer’s remorse, enough that she wasn’t ready to spend her own money to jump into The Sims 3 despite it being only $20 on Origin. (At that point it was even cheaper on Steam, but only the Windows version was available.)  Still, she got quite a few hours out of the game.  If it hadn’t been for the expansion, the cost/hours ratio would have probably put it ahead of what we get out of a lot of gaming purchases.  And I am sure she will revisit it at some point.

But that was sort of how we ended up playing Minecraft on Father’s DayThe Sims were off the menu for a bit, but Minecraft was still there for her and for us.

EverQuest II Time Locked Expansion Server Names Poll Unlocks the Irony

Meanwhile Daybreak is going forward with their EverQuest II nostalgia plan, involving those PvE and PvP Time Locked Expansion servers, and holding an in-game poll to decide what they should be named.

As noted over at the EQ2 Wire, Daybreak first went to the forums and asked for name suggestions and then… I think… drew from those suggestions.  My suggestion didn’t make the cut.  I figured that since the last great server experiment, EverQuest II Extended, got the name Freeport that it was time for Qeynos to be recognized.

That was a faint hope I am sure.  The anti-Qeynos sentiment on the team, present since before the 1999 launch of EQ, remains strong and we’re probably more likely to get a server named Qekaerbyad than Qeynos these days.  Anyway, it didn’t make the cut.  Instead, these are the names you get to choose from in the currently-running in-game poll.

EQ2TLEServerPoll

My choices indicated

For the PvP server there didn’t seem to be any obvious stand out choice, but I have always felt that Bonemore was a particularly grim sounding name, so I went with that.  Deathtoll seemed too unsubtle while the rest didn’t really resonate with me, but any of the names would probably work.

On the PvE side I could say something for Stormhold, that dungeon in Antonica in which we spent so much time back in the early days.  In fact, that would have been my go-to choice had the obvious winner not been glaring at me.

Yes, I think the only appropriate way to vote is to go with the “we’re going to keep bringing it up until you bring it back” name, Isle of Refuge.

This is almost a text book example of what SynCaine refers to as “SOE being SOE.” I cannot imagine how that name made the cut for the vote.

First, the name implies that this subscriber-only server will be a place to escape from whatever sins you care to count on the live servers.  Screw you, freeps!

Second, they will be naming a server after a zone they took out of the game which represents a good chunk of the nostalgia they are attempting to milk pander to recreate.  How is that a good idea, reminding everybody every single time they log on that the Isle of Refuge server does not include the actual Isle of Refuge that those likely to play on this server want?

So clearly, I feel you should log on immediately and vote for Isle of Refuge.

Make Isle of Refuge happen.

Ragefire – A Vote for Kunark is a Vote for… something

The current round of EverQuest time locked progression servers, Ragefire and the spill over Lockjaw, continue to provide a spectacle as they move forward.  To their credit, Daybreak does appear to be paying attention, something that differentiates this round of servers from the Fippy Darkpaw and Vulak servers, where SOE was mostly an absentee landlord, setting a bar for the minimum amount of acceptable communication and then failing to meet it.

Ragefire hanging out..

Note to self: Name future servers after dragons and not freakin’ gnolls

Having worked on the open world, contested raid boss problem last week, this week Daybreak has turned its gaze back to the population problem.  The servers remain popular despite requiring a subscription in order to play on them.  This means they are a money maker at least.  Nostalgia pays.

However, it also means Ragefire got pretty crowded pretty fast.  Daybreak initially used their multiple parallel zone instancing technology on the starter zones and upped the server capacity, but that wasn’t enough.  They put in a login queue, but that didn’t help much.  Finally, they had to relent and open up a second server, Lockjaw, and apply that parallel zone magic to even more zones in the old world.

Don't forget about me!

Lockjaw on the scene

And apparently that still wasn’t enough.  The TLP forum has been running hot with the idea of an early unlock date for the Ruins of Kunark expansion as the one true way to accommodate the population of these servers… or at least on the Ragefire server, as it remains the more popular of the two by a fair margin. (History repeats there, the spill-over server tends to be less popular.)

And Daybreak must see some merit in this idea, as there is now a poll up on Ragefire asking if the Ruins of Kunark expansion should open up earlier than planned.

Vote early, vote often, vote all your accounts

Vote early, vote often, vote all your accounts

Personally, I am sympathetic to an early opening of Kunark.  It would add a variety of additional low-to-mid level zones, zones that would likely get under-utilized once the bulk of the population leveled up past them, as would be likely after six months of classic EverQuest.

Kunark is popular and, in my opinion, perhaps the best MMO expansion ever released.

Crowd on the Kunark Dock

Crowd on the Kunark Dock during Fippy Darkpaw’s reign

Ruins of Kunark is the prototypical MMO expansion, a monument to what every MMOs first expansion ought to be as well as a warning about how hard subsequent expansion will have to work to live up to that first expansion.  It had something for pretty much everybody.  But being the child of classic, it tends to be overlooked and under utilized on the progression servers.

For Fippy Darkpaw we had to wait 90 days in classic EverQuest before Ruins of Kunark could be unlocked.  But Kunark and beyond were all 60 days from final raid boss down, something that took just a couple of days from expansion unlock.  That led to it getting short shrift in my opinion.  So, back during the progression server poll, my votes were hinged on getting the maximum amount of time with Kunark.

However, there are counter arguments.

There is the group I would call “the classicists” who simply do not want the server to progress beyond the original EverQuest content and who have vowed to vote “no” on every unlock.   That doesn’t seem to be a very realistic goal, but they certainly have the right to go that route.

Then there are those who decry the legitimacy of this vote and who worry about what precedent it will set.  The decision was made up front, via a poll of players, to unlock expansions at the current planned rate.  If you allow people to punt on that a month in for Ruins of Kunark, will we get the same thing after that unlocks?  Will players then vote in Scars of Velious early?

I get the sentiment that Daybreak shouldn’t make changes to the plan lightly.  However, I reject the idea that once a decision has been made it can never be revisited or revised, and doubly so as that original poll was taken from the EverQuest population at large.  This poll will be taken from the people actually playing on the server, who have committed to the project, and who are facing the challenges that come up.  I think that gives this poll all the legitimacy it needs, especially since Daybreak, watching things from their end, seems to think that the idea has some merit.

Then, of course, there is the question of what the level increase and better gear that comes with Kunark will actually do to the server.  The whole idea goes to hell is most people just drop classic and run to Kunark and make that the new over-crowded location.

And, finally, there are some people pointing out that all the changes that Daybreak made… the improved server capacity and the parallel zone instance technology applied to more and more zones… is actually working, and working well.  In that case, opening up Kunark early will just disperse the population and reduce the number of zone instances to the point that you won’t be able to pick one that has the camp or spawn available that you are looking for.

Now, admittedly, that isn’t how things worked back in classic EverQuest, but it seems to be working out well enough on the Ragefire server, so you have to question the desire to mess with something that seems to be going okay.

So that is the poll and some of the questions at hand.  Interesting times and I would like to say yet again how much better it is with Daybreak actually engaged with these servers, at least relative to the benign neglect we saw for most of the Fippy Darkpaw era.

Too soon?

Probably the reality for Fippy Darkpaw these days…

I would tell you how I voted on the poll… only you have to be level 10 to vote, and I am such a slacker that I don’t have a level 10 character yet.  The poll runs through the 28th, so maybe I’ll get a character there this weekend.  My bard seems the most likely candidate at this point.

Who Says I am Calm, Spontaneous, and Grounded?

Nick Yee says that about me… sort of.

Nick Yee, famous… for specific, internet definitions of fame… getting a Reddit AMA counts for something… his studies of gamers, and MMO gamers in particular, through such ventures as the The Daedalus Project and PARC PlayOn Group (as well as that WoW guild name generator) has a new research venture going on.  A note in my inbox yesterday included this announcement:

I’ve got some exciting news to share! Our game analytics consulting practice is now officially “Quantic Foundry”. And the gamer research project is now officially “The Quantic Lab”. Apart from running surveys and sharing the findings, we have also created a Gamer Motivation Profile that produces a customized report of your gaming motivations.

Check out the blog posts, take the new surveys, and try the Gamer Motivation Profile at: https://apps.quanticfoundry.com

A new survey!

Gamer Motivation Profile sounds suspiciously like the whole Bartle Test thing I suppose.  However, this new survey is at least functionally a bit different.  Where as the Bartle Test asks the taker to choose between pairs of behaviors to determine if you were an explorer, achiever, socializer, or killer, the Gamer Motivation Profile asks the taker to rank the importance to them of a series of aspects of gaming that range from “Blowing stuff up” to knowing the game’s story.

Different, but not necessarily better.  It is much easier to make choices between two behaviors than it is to rank the importance of a given aspect of gaming… at least it was for me.  You have to be a lot more in touch with what is important to you.

Anyway, once you take it you get your results and, if you sign up for an account, you also get a profile you can share with others.  Mine is here.  My basic summary is the title of this post, and the top level graph shows:

My profile summary graph

My profile summary graph

Nothing really dominates on that graph… not like Tipa’s graph, where immersion was sticking out prominently.  The results are percentiles, where I rank against other gamers.  Basically, 88% of gamers are more action oriented than I.

This probably results from me not pressing on things being at the “extremely important” end of the spectrum.  I picked that answer only once.

So Achievement and Social dominate, Immersion and Strategy are on par, and Action is way down the ladder for me.

Each of the groups is then broken out into sub-categories.  For Action there is Destruction and Excitement.

Action sub-categories

Action sub-categories

See, I do like to blow things up, I’m just not big on excitement.  I think my wife can confirm that.

For Strategy there is Mastery and Planning.

Strategy sub-categories

Strategy sub-categories

About equal on both of those.

For Achievement it is Completion and Power.

Achievement sub-categories

Achievement sub-categories

I could have told you I am far more about “doing all the things” than I am about power.

For Social there is Competition and Community.

Social sub-categories

Social sub-categories

I have been known to go on about community, right?  If somebody asks why, in EVE Online, I am in The Imperium with those horrible Goons, community is the answer.  For all you can say about them, they are pretty much dedicated to community and organizing groups that allow the individual to feel like a contributing part of that community.  My home is in Reavers, a group small enough that showing up really matters but large enough that I can’t really screw things up for the team, and I enjoy my time playing with that group.

And then, finally, there is that most illogical and fractious of terms, a word that has as many meanings as there are people who utter it, Immersion.  That actually breaks out into three, Customization, Fantasy, and Story.

Immersion cub-categories

Immersion cub-categories

Customization and Story… not so important to me I guess.  I actually have a half-finished post in my drafts folder about why story is important in MMORPGs, but how it shouldn’t override your own story.

And while I have shown some interest in customization… I use cosmetic gear slots all the time, I painted up all my cars in Need for Speed World, and I just spent a bunch of ISK on ship skins the other day in EVE Online… I tend to view that as a luxury as opposed to a necessity I suppose.

Fantasy, on the other hand… there things suddenly get important.  I will quote the summary for that sub-category:

Gamers who score high on Fantasy want their gaming experiences to allow them to become someone else, somewhere else. They enjoy the sense of being immersed in an alter ego in a believable alternate world, and enjoy exploring a game world just for the sake of exploring it. These gamers enjoy games like Skyrim, Fallout, and Mass Effect for their fully imagined alternate settings.

Except that I don’t enjoy those titles all that much… well, I only own Skyrim, but I would put Mass Effect in as a placehold for “BioWare games”  in general… because they lack the social and community aspect.  Online games have ruined me forever on a lot of solo games.

So there I am, a completionist and community (or at least group) focused player that wants to get lost in the games I play.

And while I suspect that my results might vary if I took the survey again in a few months… or next week… or tomorrow… or right now… I think that the same key points would likely shine through still.

Anyway, if you want to take the survey you can find the starting link over the Quandric Foundry Lab page.

Addendum: There is also a blog post on the site about how they created the survey.