Category Archives: YouTube

Honest Trailers does Halloween

This past week, in celebration of the release of the sequel, Screen Junkies took a look at the original classic from 1978, Halloween.

I was too young to go see it when it came out, but I remember hearing about it.  And, of course, when VCRs and video rentals became a thing half a decade later, my roommate and I watch it along with most of the movies it fostered with its success.  So many of the tropes we associate with the genre started, or were solidified, with this movie.

And, if you really want to nerd out, there is the Honest Trailers Commentary where they talk about the film and making the Honest Trailer for it.

Imperium Capital Move Op Video

I mentioned in my post about the big move op back to Delve earlier this month that our jump to the Y-2ANO Keepstar was being recorded.

A batch of caps arriving in Y-2ANO

Well, I finally spotted the video on YouTube.  It is about four minutes long, which means it is considerably sped up.

But it would have to be sped up, since the jumping in part pushed us deep into time dilation, so the first part of the video ends up being about normal game speed.  As things settle down though our movement on screen accelerates until we align out and begin warping to the gate, which happens much faster than it did at the time.

Still, if you want to see a big pile of capitals jumping to a Keepstar, this will do ya.

Honest Trailers does Doctor Who

The crew at Screen Junkies took on the Herculean task of making an Honest Trailer about Doctor Who, which involved sitting down and watching a lot of old TV.  This ended up being broken out into two videos cover classic and modern versions of the show.

Classic

Modern

Both videos try to get to the heart of each era.

Being a big fan of Screen Junkies as well as a peripheral fan of the Doctor, I also went and watched the Honest Trailers Commentary for both the classic and modern trailers where they talk about the trailer and spending lots of time watching, digesting, processing, and, in the case of the classic era, just finding seasons and episodes of the show.

There is about an hour and a half of time spent.  I enjoyed it, but I like that sort of thing.  I am the type that used to listen to the director’s commentary audio track on DVDs until the idea became mandatory for video releases and they started all getting pretty samey and dull.  Some, like the discussion track with Mike Nichols and Steven Soderbergh on the DVD for Catch-22 are wonderful.  And if you haven’t listened to both audio commentary tracks for Monty Python and the Holy Grail you cannot consider yourself a true fan.

But I digress, as usual.

Back on the topic at hand, I will say that in my own personal timeline of Doctor Who it is Tom Baker who is the Doctor, bordered by Peter Davison at the more recent end, who I think of as the guy from All Creatures Great and Small and who I sometimes mix up in my head with Tim Brooke-Taylor, and Jon Pertwee at the distant end, the old guy who I don’t recognize from anything else unless I go read his bio.

This pretty much corresponds with the primary age of television in my youth, starting with getting a small black and white Sony TV in my bedroom and ending when I got a personal computer.  After that I became a much more deliberate watcher of television.  I turn on the TV to watch something specifically and rarely just sit and watch whatever is on.  There wasn’t a TV in my dorm room in college and I went through about half the 90s with no live TV at all, just a VCR and a membership to the video rental store around the corner… and a girlfriend who recorded episodes of The Simpsons for me now and then.

And, in one final digression, what is up with that League of Legends ad that has been playing in front of videos on YouTube lately?  I guess the casual art style is open and friendly, but is it really depicting the game being advertised?  I don’t expect them to say up front that random strangers will swear at you constantly, but the whole thing doesn’t show anything about the game itself.  But I am always suspicious of ads for a product that don’t actually show the product.

The Rules for Rulers

In roaming YouTube the other day I came across this wonderfully simple and cynical look at political power and how to hold it.  A fine topic for a Sunday.

I initially clicked on it because I thought the author was “CCP Grey” and it had something to do with EVE Online.  While it may actually not relate directly to New Eden, it is still worth a watch. (I’d like to see somebody examine the keys to power in null sec empires though.)

The author has a number of other interesting videos also delivered in a soothing, well modulated tone.

Extra Credits and the Steam Data Leak

Back in July there was, for a brief time, a way to see some interesting data on a whole bunch of games available on Steam.  The total number of players for games on Steam that met certain criteria, such as having Steam achievements, was visible.  Naturally, people jumped on that while the opportunity existed.  There is an article over at Ars Technica about the whole thing which includes a downloadable .csv formatted file with all the data if you are interested.

The achievements portion means that a lot of games don’t make the list.

We don’t know how many people have played EverQuest or EVE Online on Steam, for example. We do have a number for EVE Valkyrie.  That came in 4376th place with 15,182 players.  And DC Universe Online made the cut and has had 2.8 million players on Steam.  But free is a pretty big advantage and that number doesn’t have anything to do with how long people played or if they ever used the cash shop or otherwise spent a nickel on the game.

The crew at Extra Credits did a video looking at the list and exploring some of the tidbits they found.  It is fun and worth a view.

 

One of the disparities they point out but do not fully explore is the difference in players between Civilization V and Civilization VI.

Civ V sits in 14th place with 12.7 million players while Civ VI is down in 90th position with 3.6 million players.  Their proposition is that people are waiting for all the DLC to hit before making their purchase, something I don’t quite buy.   Having played both, I don’t think Civ VI brought much to the table aside from even greater graphic detail that you’ll want to shut off to make it run well.

But you would only really know this is you played it.  So I think this might also reflect the somewhat divisive reception that Civ V has received.  I know some old Civ fans who were not happy with Civ V and who thus probably never moved on to try Civ VI.

Add in the problem with Civilization: Beyond Earth (2.6 million players on Steam) which was… well… it wasn’t the second coming of Alpha Centauri, that’s for sure… and you can imaging that Civ VI might have been fighting against Sid Meier’s previous games as much as the reviews it got.  My gut says that Civ VI getting all of its DLC done won’t get it to Civ V levels of sales.

It does warm my heart that the HD remaster of Age of Empires II: The Age of Kings has had 5.8 million players on Steam.  That is both the peak of the series as well as possibly being the peak of the RTS genre… leaving aside StarCraft of course.

And, of the more than 13K titles on the list, over 8K of them have less than 10,000 players, with last place on the list going to Disco Elysium, which has had three players.

Somebody had to be last

But it has achievements!  And, of course, it hasn’t even been released yet, so those three are probably just the Steam or dev staff.  But I thought it deserved a mention since it was last on the list.

Anyway, there is some data to play with if you are interested.

Honest Game Trailers – Fortnite Season 5

Honest Game Trailers already did a Fortnite video back at the start of the year, but that was before the game fully exploded across multiple platforms and put PUBG in the corner.  So now they are back to cover what has happened since.

I still haven’t given the game a try.

At one point my daughter tried to play Fortnite on her aging iMac and found it ran about as fast as a PowerPoint presentation.  I expect that she’ll be back to it with her new PC when school starts again and she wants to play what most of her friends are playing.